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Creating Compassionate Schools

Price

Creating Compassionate Schools

Western Oregon University

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
  • Hours: 45.00
  • University Credits: 3.00
  • Promotions
What you need to know

CE Credits Online Courses Have Been Approved for Academic Credits through Western Oregon University

  • Start anytime and work at your own convenience
  • Available 24/7 from any computer with Internet access
  • One-on-one facilitation

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Western Oregon University (WOU): WOU offers post baccalaureate, 600 graduate level credits based on the quarter system. The tuition cost is $50 per credit, plus a $10 processing fee, payable to CE Credits Online.

  • Step 1:Select your course(s) from the catalog tab above and enroll following the onscreen instructions.
  • Step 2: To request Western Oregon University (WOU) Credits:
    Western Oregon University Registration Form

    If you want WOU credit for the CE Credits Online course, you are required to submit a registration form for the course within 2 weeks of starting the class. Located on your “Student Homepage” (after you enroll) you will find a Request University Credit section under Obtaining Credits. You will select Western Oregon University and follow the instructions for requesting and paying for your WOU credits.

    To ensure that you receive credit for a specific quarter, your request, registration form and payment need to be received 20 days before the end of that quarter or the first of the month, whichever one is earlier. For example if the quarter ends on June 10th we would need to receive your request, registration form and payment by May 22nd.
  • Step 3: Once the credit fee has been paid, your completion paperwork and WOU registration will be submitted to WOU 18 days prior to the quarter ending. Allow three weeks after the end of the quarter before requesting an official or unofficial transcript.
Quarter Ending date
Fall 2012 12/13/2013
Winter 2014 03/21/2014
Spring 2014 06/17/2014
Summer 2014 08/15/2014

You can find directions for requesting an official transcript on the Western Oregon University Registrar page.

Western Oregon DEP contact information
Division of Extended Programs
Western Oregon University
345 N Monmouth Ave.
Monmouth, OR 97361
Phone: 1-800-451-5767
Fax: 503-838-8473
Email: extend@wou.edu

Western Oregon University Registration Form
If you want WOU credit for the course, the Division of Extended Programs (DEP) of Western Oregon University requires completed DEP registration forms. CE Credits Online will submit your course completion paperwork for each CE Credits Online course. Please print the Western Oregon University Registration Form and complete items #1-15, skip #14 Method of Payment. Sign and date on #16 and fax to CE Credits Online 1-425-844-4164 or mail to:

CE Credits Online
Attention: Sandra Blazevich
23224 NE 156th PL.
Woodinville, WA. 98077

CE Credits Online can not process your academic credit request without the completed Western Oregon University DEP registration form. If you have any questions please contact DEP office or visit the website: http://www.wou.edu/provost/extprogram/creditoverlay_CEONLINE.php.

Course Description

Course Description:

While it is widely recognized that teachers are tasked with creating the learning conditions for students, some student-specific variables represent situations well beyond the teacher’s and the student’s control. These student-specific variables can include a number of traumatic events experienced by the child, including: tragic accidents, sudden death of parent(s), natural disasters), physical/emotional/sexual abuse, drug abuse and addiction in the household, and incarceration of a parent and/or significant adult. Educators need to understand the ways the ways in which the needs of children who experience trauma and/or sustained periods of stress can differ significantly from their peers. For teachers not completely aware of the ways that adverse childhood experiences (or ACE’s) can impact students, the challenges for both students and teachers alike can be magnified. Taken in combination with the myriad of other ways that students differ, it is important that teachers have a plan for how they will understand the needs of learners with complex needs and respond compassionately so that all students remain connected to their schooling experience.

Creating Compassionate Schools will provide teachers an overview of the rationale for embracing pedagogical strategies rooted in compassion. The course has been developed to introduce educators to the principles and practices of an approach that takes aim at “getting it right” for both students and their teachers. Creating Compassionate Schools will provide an introductory look at the scientific research-base emerging from a number of disciplines (e.g., social services, education research, neurobiology, public health approaches) in support of compassionate schooling. With compassion as a lens through which professionals can view their work, a number of topics such as professional learning communities, action research and job satisfaction will be explored. Implications of the approach will be discussed as well as barriers to implementation.

Attention will also be devoted to considering the shifting educational landscape as legislative efforts to increase the prominence of social and emotional learning (SEL) standards across K-12 settings are occurring. The defining characteristics of Compassionate Schools will be considered along with characteristics of other movements such as Positive Behavior and Instructional Supports (PBIS), Differentiated Instruction (DI) and Whole Child Education. Exemplars of states operating in alignment with compassionate schooling principles will included.

Teachers responding to the needs of a diverse learning population that include such variables often feel unprepared and isolated. Attempts to connect with colleagues and others within their educational context can yield limited results. Creating Compassionate Schools will also include resources for reflecting on the level of complexity present in classrooms today. Research-based information and strategies will provide course participants with:

  1. a pedagogical framework which recognizes a definition of student diversity that includes students impacted by adverse childhood experiences,
  2. strategies for professionals attempting to meet the immediate needs of learners impacted by adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s),
  3. tools which teachers may use immediately within a compassionate approach, and
  4. strategies and tools for engaging colleagues to respond similarly so that a culture of care is the long-term result in educational settings where children with complex needs are served.

Designed with a K-12 professional audience in mind, Creating Compassionate Schools offers insight into challenges faced by professionals across the educational spectrum in identifying, addressing, and collaborating around the complex needs of students.

Course Objectives:

  • Distinguish between “empathy” and “compassion” within the school setting
  • Understand the role compassionate schooling plays within the broad context of school reform
  • Consider legislative efforts reflecting increased awareness of need for social emotional learning standards (SEL) nationwide
  • Understand the concerns some professionals may have regarding creating compassionate schools
  • Locate information on rationale for compassionate schools that supports a balanced reform approach
  • Understand the philosophical framework that supports the compassionate schooling approach
  • Locate and access best practice government resources relevant to social emotional learning and concepts associated with compassionate schooling
  • Utilize a self-reflection tool to determine the current level of implementation of social emotional learning for the course participant’s context.
  • Learn a working definition of a “compassionate school”
  • Understand how different movements (e.g., Differentiation Instruction, PBIS, SEL) fit with a compassionate schooling approach
  • Identify characteristics of positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS) that may already exist in teaching context
  • Understand and assess for level of evidence of social and emotional learning (SEL) within current teaching context
  • Review one state’s model for supporting school districts to implement compassionate schools.
  • Identify barriers to creating compassionate schools
  • Understand the significance of the concept of a “standard of care” within educational settings
  • Articulate the ways in which creating a compassionate school demonstrates a professional “standard of care”
  • Understand the basis for a shift from reliance on educational labels toward understanding learner complexity
  • Consider how professional responses to student needs can alleviate or increase student needs
  • Identify one state-level attempt to implement social emotional learning (SEL) standards
  • Understand and apply terminology of “compassion satisfaction” and “compassion fatigue” to their own work context
  • Apply a specific reflection strategy that demonstrates understanding of the challenges associated with serving students with complex needs
  • Understand the significance of students feeling connected to their school experience.
  • Recognize the degree to which adverse childhood experiences create disconnects for learners as they experience school
  • Review importance of complying with mandatory reporting requirements
  • Understand the ways in which students who have experienced adverse childhood experiences are in “triple jeopardy”
  • Discern the difference between behavioral forms and behavioral functions
  • Validate the need for professions to listen for a student’s “voice” through their behaviors
  • Understand how an increased awareness of the impact of maltreatment reinforces the need for brain-compatible learning approaches
  • Understand the educational significance of the current scientific research on the impacts of adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s)
  • Understand how ACE’s can potentially increase complexities for students, parents, and professionals, and communities
  • Develop awareness of a tool for assessing individual and collective (eg, classroom, school) levels of student maltreatment and ACE’s.
  • Conduct a survey of colleagues on the concept of ACE’s and report observations demonstrating understanding of concepts
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect on your own level of ACE’s and how this may influence your interactions with students
  • Distinguish characteristics of “good stress” and “bad stress” and how these impact capacity to learn
  • Locate resources that could be useful in identifying characteristics of students experiencing childhood traumatic stress
  • Learn basic components of effective engagement with students who are currently experiencing varying levels of stress
  • Demonstrate understanding of course concepts by completing a functional based assessment on a particular student
  • Interpret information about the negative impacts of early adversity and “toxic stress levels” and apply this information to current teaching context
  • Articulate different types of trauma and how they might impact educational routines
  • Implement a “compassionate schooling action plan” at the individual, classroom, or school level and provide evidence of impact.
  • Demonstrate understanding of core compassionate school concepts through submission of personal teaching philosophy statement reflecting course concepts
Syllabus
  • Course:
    Creating Compassionate Schools
  • Prerequisites:
    None

Course Description:

While it is widely recognized that teachers are tasked with creating the learning conditions for students, some student-specific variables represent situations well beyond the teacher’s and the student’s control. These student-specific variables can include a number of traumatic events experienced by the child, including: tragic accidents, sudden death of parent(s), natural disasters), physical/emotional/sexual abuse, drug abuse and addiction in the household, and incarceration of a parent and/or significant adult. Educators need to understand the ways the ways in which the needs of children who experience trauma and/or sustained periods of stress can differ significantly from their peers. For teachers not completely aware of the ways that adverse childhood experiences (or ACE’s) can impact students, the challenges for both students and teachers alike can be magnified. Taken in combination with the myriad of other ways that students differ, it is important that teachers have a plan for how they will understand the needs of learners with complex needs and respond compassionately so that all students remain connected to their schooling experience.

Creating Compassionate Schools will provide teachers an overview of the rationale for embracing pedagogical strategies rooted in compassion. The course has been developed to introduce educators to the principles and practices of an approach that takes im at “getting it right” for both students and their teachers. Creating Compassionate Schools will provide an introductory look at the scientific research-base emerging from a number of disciplines (e.g., social services, education research, neurobiology, public health approaches) in support of compassionate schooling. With compassion as a lens through which professionals can view their work, a number of topics such as professional learning communities, action research and job satisfaction will be explored. Implications of the approach will be discussed as well as barriers to implementation.

Attention will also be devoted to considering the shifting educational landscape as legislative efforts to increase the prominence of social and emotional learning (SEL) standards across K-12 settings are occurring. The defining characteristics of Compassionate Schools will be considered along with characteristics of other movements such as Positive Behavior and Instructional Supports (PBIS), Differentiated Instruction (DI) and Whole Child Education. Exemplars of states operating in alignment with compassionate schooling principles will included.

Teachers responding to the needs of a diverse learning population that include such variables often feel unprepared and isolated. Attempts to connect with colleagues and others within their educational context can yield limited results. Creating Compassionate Schools will also include resources for reflecting on the level of complexity present in classrooms today. Research-based information and strategies will provide course participants with:

  1. a pedagogical framework which recognizes a definition of student diversity that includes students impacted by adverse childhood experiences,
  2. strategies for professionals attempting to meet the immediate needs of learners impacted by adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s),
  3. tools which teachers may use immediately within a compassionate approach, and
  4. strategies and tools for engaging colleagues to respond similarly so that a culture of care is the long-term result in educational settings where children with complex needs are served.
Designed with a K-12 professional audience in mind, Creating Compassionate Schools offers insight into challenges faced by professionals across the educational spectrum in identifying, addressing, and collaborating around the complex needs of students.

Course Objectives:

  • Distinguish between “empathy” and “compassion” within the school setting
  • Understand the role compassionate schooling plays within the broad context of school reform
  • Consider legislative efforts reflecting increased awareness of need for social emotional learning standards (SEL) nationwide
  • Understand the concerns some professionals may have regarding creating compassionate schools
  • Locate information on rationale for compassionate schools that supports a balanced reform approach
  • Understand the philosophical framework that supports the compassionate schooling approach
  • Locate and access best practice government resources relevant to social emotional learning and concepts associated with compassionate schooling
  • Utilize a self-reflection tool to determine the current level of implementation of social emotional learning for the course participant’s context.
  • Learn a working definition of a “compassionate school”
  • Understand how different movements (e.g., Differentiation Instruction, PBIS, SEL) fit with a compassionate schooling approach
  • Identify characteristics of positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS) that may already exist in teaching context
  • Understand and assess for level of evidence of social and emotional learning (SEL) within current teaching context
  • Review one state’s model for supporting school districts to implement compassionate schools.
  • Identify barriers to creating compassionate schools
  • Understand the significance of the concept of a “standard of care” within educational settings
  • Articulate the ways in which creating a compassionate school demonstrates a professional “standard of care”
  • Understand the basis for a shift from reliance on educational labels toward understanding learner complexity
  • Consider how professional responses to student needs can alleviate or increase student needs
  • Identify one state-level attempt to implement social emotional learning (SEL) standards
  • Understand and apply terminology of “compassion satisfaction” and “compassion fatigue” to their own work context
  • Apply a specific reflection strategy that demonstrates understanding of the challenges associated with serving students with complex needs
  • Understand the significance of students feeling connected to their school experience.
  • Recognize the degree to which adverse childhood experiences create disconnects for learners as they experience school
  • Review importance of complying with mandatory reporting requirements
  • Understand the ways in which students who have experienced adverse childhood experiences are in “triple jeopardy”
  • Discern the difference between behavioral forms and behavioral functions
  • Validate the need for professions to listen for a student’s “voice” through their behaviors
  • Understand how an increased awareness of the impact of maltreatment reinforces the need for brain-compatible learning approaches
  • Understand the educational significance of the current scientific research on the impacts of adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s)
  • Understand how ACE’s can potentially increase complexities for students, parents, and professionals, and communities
  • Develop awareness of a tool for assessing individual and collective (eg, classroom, school) levels of student maltreatment and ACE’s.
  • Conduct a survey of colleagues on the concept of ACE’s and report observations demonstrating understanding of concepts
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect on your own level of ACE’s and how this may influence your interactions with students
  • Distinguish characteristics of “good stress” and “bad stress” and how these impact capacity to learn
  • Locate resources that could be useful in identifying characteristics of students experiencing childhood traumatic stress
  • Learn basic components of effective engagement with students who are currently experiencing varying levels of stress
  • Demonstrate understanding of course concepts by completing a functional based assessment on a particular student
  • Interpret information about the negative impacts of early adversity and “toxic stress levels” and apply this information to current teaching context
  • Articulate different types of trauma and how they might impact educational routines
  • Implement a “compassionate schooling action plan” at the individual, classroom, or school level and provide evidence of impact.
  • Demonstrate understanding of core compassionate school concepts through submission of personal teaching philosophy statement reflecting course concepts

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will need to do the exercises, complete the online assignments, and post responses that are indicated to the forum for feedback. In addition, participants will be expected to apply certain skills-building exercises in their own setting and report the results of that to the forum. Participation is necessary for passing the course.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see University Affiliations under the Information Center for the cost per credit.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1: WHY COMPASSIONATE SCHOOLS ARE NEEDED
    • Introduction
    • 1.a Concerned About Compassion?
    • 1.b Addressing Concern # 1: Compassionate Schooling is Unscientific
    • 1.c Addressing Concern # 2: Compassionate Schooling is a Distraction from “Real Reform”?
    • 1.d Understanding How Reform Efforts Move at the Speed of Relationships
    • 1.e When Relationships Slow to a Crawl
    • 1.f Addressing Concern #3: Can Educators Opt Out of the Compassionate Schooling Approach?
    • 1.g Compassion Helps Frame “The Big Picture”
  • Lesson 2: WHAT IS A COMPASSIONATE SCHOOL?
    • 2.a Characteristics of Compassionate Schooling
    • 2.b Principles of Compassionate Schooling
    • 2.c A Working Definition of a Compassionate School
    • 2.d Barriers to Creating Compassionate Schools
  • Lesson 3: COMMON CARE STANDARDS
    • 3.a Common CARE Standards
    • 3.b What is Education’s “Standard of Care”?
    • 3.c Why A “Duty To Care” Will Not Satisfy
    • 3.d Compassion Is Fueled by Curiosity
    • 3.e Compassion Anticipates the Essential Questions of the Learner’s Heart
  • Lesson 4: COMPASSION HONORS THE COMPLEXITY OF DIVERSITY
    • 4.a Compassion Honors the Complexity of Diversity
    • 4.b Complexity in the Context of Compassion
    • 4.c Complexity is a Moving Target for Compassion
    • 4.d The Core of a Compassionate School Professional
    • 4.e What Kinds of Problems Does Compassion Solve?
  • Lesson 5: COMPASSION CREATES CONNECTIONS
    • 5.a How the Need for Connectedness Leads Us to Consider Compassion
    • 5.b A Disconnect for Education
    • 5.c Connecting the Disconnected
    • 5.d Compassion Hears a Voice Through Behavior
    • 5.e How Compassion Helps Professionals Learn
  • Lesson 6: UNDERSTANDING ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACE’S)
    • 6.a Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE’s)
    • 6.b Findings of the ACE Study
    • 6.c Reflecting on the Meaning of ACE’s
    • 6.d How Becoming ACE’s-aware Challenges and Changes Us
    • 6.e Implications of ACE’s Research for Educators
    • 6.f How Being ACE-informed Increases Protective Factors
  • Midterm
  • Lesson 7: HOW STRESS AND TRAUMA IMPACT LEARNING
    • 7.a Stress In Context
    • 7.b Understanding “Good Stress” and “Bad Stress”
    • 7.c The Impact of Stress On Learning
    • 7.d Trauma Is Sometimes the Elusive “Something Else”
    • 7.e How Stress Impacts Us Physiologically
    • 7.f Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    • 7.g Our Brains are a “Driving” Force
    • 7.h Does All Stress Lead to Trauma?
    • 7i Strategies That Promote a Culture of Calm
  • Lesson 8: MOVING AT THE SPEED OF RELATIONSHIPS
    • 8.a The Importance of Sharing Power with Learners
    • 8.b Improving Our Relationships with Learners
    • 8.c Course Conclusion
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

CE Credits Online Anytime-Anywhere

  • Standards-based 
  • University credits available* 
  • Asynchronous – start at any time – 24/7
  • Self-paced – work at your own pace and convenience 
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills 

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

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CE Credits Online is pleased to announce it is launching the CE Credits Online Monthly Newsletter. Every month the newsletter will offer a discount on one or more CE Credits Online courses—often with savings that can amount to hundreds of dollars. The only way to receive these discounts (using a promotional code) is to receive the newsletter. The newsletter is free and will have various features we believe will be of interest to all educators.

Once you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive a confirmation email and a link to the CE Credits Online Newsletter and the discounts that are being offered for that month. Discounts change monthly.

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Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • I have learned the most important thing I can do for my students is to use the I-CARE process. My job is to teach the common core standards. Students’ misbehavior's are a result of unmet needs in the child’s life, and I will try to identify those students’ needs and meet those needs the best I can, if I can’t rectify the issue seek peer assistance. Now when reflecting on my students’ misbehavior's don’t ask myself “What’s wrong with this child” but ask myself, “What might have happened to this child.” I’m going to try a compassionate school’s strategy with my 4th grade classes. I plan to have a feelings chart aligned to my seating chart, (student names are not used but color and numbers, I have a five colored squares rug). I did mention this strategy in another form exercise. At the beginning of this school year I’m also going to add the students questions fm the heart to my classroom expectations. I thank you for giving me a different way to observe my school, to observe my school the compassionate way. 

    What a participant from Alabama said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • This class helped me turn feelings of compassion into pedagogical strategies rooted in compassion. Compassion is a deep empathy and respect that shows itself in instructional practices. This working definition of compassion is more than a feeling. It's action! Rather that compassion being something that is done (curriculum), is is HOW something is done (method). Teachers often see aggressive behavior in schools. A good question to ask is: What unmet needs is my student experiencing? Students have disparities in skill levels when meeting their own needs. No two students will react the same way, making compassionate teaching a skill or art. When compassion is not present, one outcome is disengagement. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation points our that the decision to drop out of high school does not happen in a single morning, rather, it comes after a long period of disengagement. So how can we engage? Hamre and Piniata give four helpful observations in their 2004 study. I will share my favorite two: 1) Had good classroom management skills with clear expectations but flexible routines so that students followed rules independently, and 2)Created a positive and upbeat classroom climate where laughter, excitement, and pleasant conversation were evident. Since the question asks for application I will share that between activities sometimes we need a transition to give our brains a break. I have a song I play on the piano, and between verses elementary students can raise their hand to tell a clean joke or tell a funny story. This keeps all of our moods light and keeps us seeing the best in each other. The CASEL self-assessment guide asks, "What approaches do you use to create a safe and caring classroom community?" Thankfully, my elementary school is a TRIBES school. To briefly describe TRIBES, classrooms are based on four agreements: attentive listening, appreciations only/no put-downs, mutual respect, and the right to pass. We run our staff meetings in the way we want our classrooms to run. TRIBES also offers fun community-building activities. There must be no doubt in my learners' minds that if/as/when they struggle academically OR emotionally/socially that I actually believe my role as a teacher is to help walk them safely through the learning process as many times as is needed. Like a bicycle built for two - we achieve results in tandem, not in isolation. To break away from the historical pattern of viewing students with labels, it is important to consider the level of complexity they create for me, the teacher. Each student is first and foremost a general education student. Viewing them through this lens will help me celebrate their full capacities. Students potentially come to us with a background of adverse childhood experiences. Gertrude Marrow's work "The Compassionate School" (1987) is still relevant today, but in addition to the "latch-key kid" syndrome of yesteryear, our students today also have to deal with texting, cyber bullying, and sexting. Popular children's author Patricia Pollacco has a popular book on bullying called "Thank You Mr. Falkker", and to update this topic, her latest book is called "Bully" on the topic of cyber bullying. This opens the door to fruitful class discussion, and keeps my own mind aware. I appreciate the sentences from this course: "Teachers who recognize a thoughtful response is needed can find this awareness contributes to their own stress levels as they attempt to meet a wide range of social, emotional, and psychological needs so that academic goals can ultimately be addressed. The complexity that maltreated students bring to school on a daily basis reinforces the fact that students do not all arrive as a prototypical or “ideal” student. In an ideal world, no student would arrive for school having experienced abuse, neglect, or any event resulting in trauma." Children who experience maltreatment by a caregiver will feel flawed, worthless, unwanted or valued only to meet another’s needs. They believe this because they have been treated as though this were true. Karyn Purvis and David Cross' article "Caught Between the Amygdala and a Hard Place" compassionately describes the chronic mode of a child to fight, flight, or freeze. I share their goal to be a healer and find "beauty of each struggling child" that is "simply hidden beneath a thin veneer of aberrant behaviors".

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • I learned many valuable things from this course and will take much of those strategies and ideas with me to the classroom. I was unfamilar with the term ACE. Learned much about what these poor kids are dealing with. I dont think people really realize what educators are responsible for on a daily basis it goes far beyond teaching curriculum. The classroom for so many students is the only safe, loving and consistent environment they know. I will continue to be compassionate, caring, consistnet, knowledable and aware of who my students are. I will also take back and share with my collegues what this course was about and hopefully incorporate more compassion at my school site.

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • The key items I learned are in regard to the ACE stressors that are affecting many of our student population and how to lesson plan with those as a consideration. I also need to realize that many teachers either are unaware of these stressors or are in denial about them. I need to consider that some of my students have had such severe situations that they can or may be suffering from things as severe as PTSD because of this I need to allow time in all lessons to be able to have one on one conversations with students and have back up plans to decompress intense situations. It is important that students feel safe and comfortable to learn. The expectations for education need to stay the same, but there needs to be flexibility in the lessons to adjust for students who are experiencing blocks. I will make sure I always use tools such as guided notes so that students who are not emotionally available to learn on a certain day have a way to relearn information and not fall behind in class without having to ask for help from friends. I just need to always make sure there are built in buffers in my lessons. In addition to this I need to model positive communication and respect even when I am not receiving it from certain students. I decide this year to try an idea that a co teacher once mentioned to me and it applies very much to this course. She said every year her goal is to pick a kid that is HARD. One that makes your skin crawl and is tough to teach and find a way to break into them in a good way. She said start small with finding something you like about them or that you see kids like in them and work from there. She said there is nothing to lose since they are already checked out, so why not just try. She said she rarely does not succeed at getting them hooked. This is a small way of making this task of dealing with all the issues covered in this course less overwhelming. If you can teach to this kid and get this kid hooked chances are you can get the rest and create the environment needed to be supportive for the rest as well.

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • From this course I learned that as a teacher I need to ensure I do not take a short sighted approach to student disengagement or misbehavior. That I need to dig a little deeper, take a little more time and try to understand what is happening with a student who is having difficulties. I need to ensure that I do not compound and add to these difficulties in my classroom and in doing so I need to look at how I respond to my students and relate to them. I need to make sure I try to keep my classroom a safe place for students, and that “safe” is not a term that I define, but a term that the students define. To that end I need to ask struggling students what I can do to help them feel safer in my room, and more willing to being open to the learning that is taking place. This will take some honest discussions with some students and a good honest look at what I am doing and how I can change it to improve the environment the students spend their day in. These are some of easier steps that I plan on implementing in my classroom on the road to creating a more compassionate class.

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • This course contains a wealth of valuable information. The Oregon University brain research coupled with the Harvard child development studies were revelations. The results of toxic stress at an early age and the continuing effects on the mind and body spoke right to the heart of the poor, neglected, and abused population of students I serve. While I boast about creating a “safe” learning environment, (Maxim #11: Learners do not care how much you know until they know how much you care: A+), I need to be more attuned to students needs and establish an ongoing dialogue with learners to “design” engagement and remove distractions so students have a greater opportunity to learn. I have settled for their “best” and hindered their brain growth.

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • There have been several key learnings from this course. First of all, I understand compassion as a response to the needs of learners. In my practice, I will shift from being empathetic, to actively seeking out ways to respond to the needs of my students. In order to do this, I know I must be able to see those needs. I will continue to work to build connected relationships with my students and attempt to understand their needs. Further, I realize that ACE's are an unfortunate reality for many students. I have learned how severely students are effected by ACE's, and that the stress inflicted can be long lasting and even brain altering. For my practice, this translates into knowing that some students' social and emotional needs must be addressed before they can access the academic curriculum. I know compassion doesn't come in a "one-size-fits-all program," but rather is an approach to the needs of individual students. The response will depend on who that student is, and what their particular needs are. I am committed to continuing to learn more about creating compassionate schools, and refining my practice to provide a compassionate learning environment.

    What a participant from California said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • I learned my whole concept of compassionate schooling was off base. I feel like I am a little ahead in compassionate schooling because it is how I parent at home 99% of the time. I knew nothing of ACE's and that was a HUGE eye opener for me, my ACE score was 7, but I have become a good example of what can happen when someone is compassionate and believes in you. This course gave me a new perseverance in my teaching (subbing now but want to go back to full time)to reaching ALL students. I really feel I can make a difference and plan on using this course to my full advantage, whether it be at home, once in a while (sub day) or in the future when I am back to teaching full time. Everyone counts, and I think sometimes we forget that we have so much control and ability to help another person across the ravine. (or help them fall in it). I honestly can't say I wouldn't use any part of this course. I loved the brain videos and feel those would be a great thing in health and in human development classes.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • Overall this course has really opened up my eyes and my heart to what it really means to be compassionate. In the past I have though of myself as a compassionate teacher, however, this course has shown me that there are so many different variables to consider when attempting to really create a compassionate school. I was very happy to learn about ACEs and how to identify students with high ACEs scores. I think that this information will really be useful when working with a student who may seem difficult or challenging. This past year I had several students who I struggled with and to be completely honest I did not really think about their past traumas. The idea that a students is like an iceberg and you really only see whats on top, is a monumental statement. As educators we very rarely understand each of our students' life experiences. Although I meet my students when they are just starting off in life (second grade), I think that it is so important to remember that trauma can occur all the way to infancy and specific traumas impact children's brain development. My favor lesson was lesson 7 that focuses on how stress impacts learning and how it affects brain development. This particular lesson really made me reflect on the stressors I create in my student's lives and how I can alleviate that stress to create a more compassionate learning environment. Overall, I gained many new ideas, beliefs, and values from this course. I know that I will step into my new classroom next year thinking and breathing compassion. I will make many new changes including surveys, aces, and community building activities in hopes to create a learning environment where all students feel important and loved.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Creating Compassionate Schools
  • I am focused more on the whole child with a greater in depth understanding of those components. For years we have known that each student is different in where they are at in prepardiness to learn. Now there is concrete data, break terms, evaluations ,bs nice to support it. Now as a profession making the move to incorporate that into our daily interactions with students. I think the ACE part of course was the best. Supported that we need to meet the whole child is at when they are standing in front of us. Personally evaluating my self explained why when I was at low scioeconmic school with lots of kids with high ACE scores I was exhausted, burning out. I am at high socioeconomic school with a few ACE issues in each class and I am borderline bored. I can do more for those students now. It's the root cause I need to look at prior to jumping in... I have new learning to do better which I hope is every educators goal.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Creating Compassionate Schools