Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP

Price

Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP

ASPDP

  • Tuition: $160.00
What you need to know

3 "P" CREDITS -- ONLY $160 FOR EACH COURSE (13 available)
(does not include $125 ASPDP fee)

Salary differentials for NYC DOE Employees and/or
the 175 Required NYS PD Hours

 

SpringDates SummerDates 
Spring 2015 Term Registration Opens: December 15, 2014            Summer 2015 Term Registration Opens:     May 18, 2015
Spring 2015 Term Registration Closes: April 3, 2015 Summer 2015 Term Registration Closes: July 20, 2015
 Courses Begin: February 16, 2015 Courses Begin: July 6, 2015
Complete Courses: June 26, 2015 Complete Courses by: August 17, 2015

Newsletter


CE Credits Online is pleased to announce it is launching the CE Credits Online Monthly Newsletter. Every month the newsletter will offer a discount on one or more CE Credits Online courses—often with savings that can amount to hundreds of dollars. The only way to receive these discounts (using a promotional code) is to receive the newsletter. The newsletter is free and will have various features we believe will be of interest to all educators.

Once you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive a confirmation email and a link to the CE Credits Online Newsletter and the discounts that are being offered for that month. Discounts change monthly.

Click Here to Sign Up.

 

 How to Register and Enroll

  1. Register. To obtain "P" credits, you must register for each CE Credits Online course on the NYC DOE ASPDP website. If you do not have an account, you must create one.
    1. Our courses are in the ASPDP catalog using the provider drop-down menu and selecting CE Credits Online/Riesling Group. You will pay the NYC DOE ASPDP fee of $125 when you register.
  2. Enroll. Once you have registered, you must enroll on the CE Credits Online website (www.cecreditsonline.org/ASPDP). You are here now, so you may proceed if you have already registered for your courses.  Click "Add to the Cart" to enroll in the courses in which you registered for through the NYC DOE ASPDP.  You will pay the $160 course fee to CE Credits Online. 
    1. If you enroll on the CE Credits Online website prior to registering on the NYC DOE ASPDP website, you will be enrolled, but if you do not register on the NYC DOE ASPDP website within two weeks of enrolling, you will be locked out of your CE Credits Online account. This ensures you do not miss registering with the NYC DOE ASPDP and thereby fail to qualify for "P" credits. You will be able to access your courses again when you are registered and have paid on the NYC DOE ASPDP website.
    2. CE Credits Online checks its enrollments against NYC DOE ASPDP registrants weekly to ensure everyone who has enrolled is registered. 
    3. Once the term begins you may access your course.
  3. Completion. At the end of the term, we will notify NYC DOE ASPDP of your completion status. They will verify your grades and payments. Once you have been “Validated for Credit” on the NYC DOE ASPDP site, you will be able to print your P Credit Transcript. To view or print your transcript(s), go to “Show Enrolled Courses” on the ASPDP site and select the “View Print Transcripts” tab.

Cost: $285 ($160 payable to CE Credits Online, $125 payable to the NYC DOE ASPDP)
Please Read: ASPDP Refund Policy & Program Policy
Credits Earned: 3 "P" Credits (each)
Course Length: 36 Hours (self-paced, work anytime, anywhere)
Access: 100% Online, 24/7, no late registrations, no extensions
Format: engaging presentation of material, video modeling with real teachers in the classroom, forum discussions. Apply new strategies (K-12) and receive 1-on-1 feedback.

Please read: “P” Credit Requirements

“P” Credit Requirements

  • Courses are available for “P” credits for NYC Salary Differentials and/or the 175 hour NYS PD Requirement.

              University Credits are not available for NYC DOE ASPDP “P” credit courses.

  • CE Credits Online provides online courses approved for “P” credits, and NYC DOE After School Professional Development Program (ASPDP) issues the “P” credits.
  • To receive “P” credits from NYC DOE ASPDP you must register on their site and complete your coursework on the CE Credits Online website according to the registration and completion deadlines listed on the ASPDP website.
  • If you do not complete your coursework by the end of the term and you still want to receive "P" credits, you will need to re-register and pay for the course again in the term you will complete.
Course Description

Course Description:

While it is widely recognized that teachers are tasked with creating the learning conditions for students, some student-specific variables represent situations well beyond the teacher’s and the student’s control. These student-specific variables can include a number of traumatic events experienced by the child, including: tragic accidents, sudden death of parent(s), natural disasters), physical/emotional/sexual abuse, drug abuse and addiction in the household, and incarceration of a parent and/or significant adult. Educators need to understand the ways the ways in which the needs of children who experience trauma and/or sustained periods of stress can differ significantly from their peers. For teachers not completely aware of the ways that adverse childhood experiences (or ACE’s) can impact students, the challenges for both students and teachers alike can be magnified. Taken in combination with the myriad of other ways that students differ, it is important that teachers have a plan for how they will understand the needs of learners with complex needs and respond compassionately so that all students remain connected to their schooling experience.

Creating Compassionate Schools will provide teachers an overview of the rationale for embracing pedagogical strategies rooted in compassion. The course has been developed to introduce educators to the principles and practices of an approach that takes aim at “getting it right” for both students and their teachers. Creating Compassionate Schools will provide an introductory look at the scientific research-base emerging from a number of disciplines (e.g., social services, education research, neurobiology, public health approaches) in support of compassionate schooling. With compassion as a lens through which professionals can view their work, a number of topics such as professional learning communities, action research and job satisfaction will be explored. Implications of the approach will be discussed as well as barriers to implementation.

Attention will also be devoted to considering the shifting educational landscape as legislative efforts to increase the prominence of social and emotional learning (SEL) standards across K-12 settings are occurring. The defining characteristics of Compassionate Schools will be considered along with characteristics of other movements such as Positive Behavior and Instructional Supports (PBIS), Differentiated Instruction (DI) and Whole Child Education. Exemplars of states operating in alignment with compassionate schooling principles will included.

Teachers responding to the needs of a diverse learning population that include such variables often feel unprepared and isolated. Attempts to connect with colleagues and others within their educational context can yield limited results. Creating Compassionate Schools will also include resources for reflecting on the level of complexity present in classrooms today. Research-based information and strategies will provide course participants with:

  1. a pedagogical framework which recognizes a definition of student diversity that includes students impacted by adverse childhood experiences,
  2. strategies for professionals attempting to meet the immediate needs of learners impacted by adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s),
  3. tools which teachers may use immediately within a compassionate approach, and
  4. strategies and tools for engaging colleagues to respond similarly so that a culture of care is the long-term result in educational settings where children with complex needs are served.

Designed with a K-12 professional audience in mind, Creating Compassionate Schools offers insight into challenges faced by professionals across the educational spectrum in identifying, addressing, and collaborating around the complex needs of students.

Course Objectives:

  • Distinguish between “empathy” and “compassion” within the school setting
  • Understand the role compassionate schooling plays within the broad context of school reform
  • Consider legislative efforts reflecting increased awareness of need for social emotional learning standards (SEL) nationwide
  • Understand the concerns some professionals may have regarding creating compassionate schools
  • Locate information on rationale for compassionate schools that supports a balanced reform approach
  • Understand the philosophical framework that supports the compassionate schooling approach
  • Locate and access best practice government resources relevant to social emotional learning and concepts associated with compassionate schooling
  • Utilize a self-reflection tool to determine the current level of implementation of social emotional learning for the course participant’s context.
  • Learn a working definition of a “compassionate school”
  • Understand how different movements (e.g., Differentiation Instruction, PBIS, SEL) fit with a compassionate schooling approach
  • Identify characteristics of positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS) that may already exist in teaching context
  • Understand and assess for level of evidence of social and emotional learning (SEL) within current teaching context
  • Review one state’s model for supporting school districts to implement compassionate schools.
  • Identify barriers to creating compassionate schools
  • Understand the significance of the concept of a “standard of care” within educational settings
  • Articulate the ways in which creating a compassionate school demonstrates a professional “standard of care”
  • Understand the basis for a shift from reliance on educational labels toward understanding learner complexity
  • Consider how professional responses to student needs can alleviate or increase student needs
  • Identify one state-level attempt to implement social emotional learning (SEL) standards
  • Understand and apply terminology of “compassion satisfaction” and “compassion fatigue” to their own work context
  • Apply a specific reflection strategy that demonstrates understanding of the challenges associated with serving students with complex needs
  • Understand the significance of students feeling connected to their school experience.
  • Recognize the degree to which adverse childhood experiences create disconnects for learners as they experience school
  • Review importance of complying with mandatory reporting requirements
  • Understand the ways in which students who have experienced adverse childhood experiences are in “triple jeopardy”
  • Discern the difference between behavioral forms and behavioral functions
  • Validate the need for professions to listen for a student’s “voice” through their behaviors
  • Understand how an increased awareness of the impact of maltreatment reinforces the need for brain-compatible learning approaches
  • Understand the educational significance of the current scientific research on the impacts of adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s)
  • Understand how ACE’s can potentially increase complexities for students, parents, and professionals, and communities
  • Develop awareness of a tool for assessing individual and collective (eg, classroom, school) levels of student maltreatment and ACE’s.
  • Conduct a survey of colleagues on the concept of ACE’s and report observations demonstrating understanding of concepts
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect on your own level of ACE’s and how this may influence your interactions with students
  • Distinguish characteristics of “good stress” and “bad stress” and how these impact capacity to learn
  • Locate resources that could be useful in identifying characteristics of students experiencing childhood traumatic stress
  • Learn basic components of effective engagement with students who are currently experiencing varying levels of stress
  • Demonstrate understanding of course concepts by completing a functional based assessment on a particular student
  • Interpret information about the negative impacts of early adversity and “toxic stress levels” and apply this information to current teaching context
  • Articulate different types of trauma and how they might impact educational routines
  • Implement a “compassionate schooling action plan” at the individual, classroom, or school level and provide evidence of impact.
  • Demonstrate understanding of core compassionate school concepts through submission of personal teaching philosophy statement reflecting course concepts
Syllabus
  • Course:
    Creating Compassionate Schools For ASPDP
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Number of Credits:
    3 P-credits
  • Number of Hours:
    36 hours

Course Description:

While it is widely recognized that teachers are tasked with creating the learning conditions for students, some student-specific variables represent situations well beyond the teacher’s and the student’s control. These student-specific variables can include a number of traumatic events experienced by the child, including: tragic accidents, sudden death of parent(s), natural disasters), physical/emotional/sexual abuse, drug abuse and addiction in the household, and incarceration of a parent and/or significant adult. Educators need to understand the ways the ways in which the needs of children who experience trauma and/or sustained periods of stress can differ significantly from their peers. For teachers not completely aware of the ways that adverse childhood experiences (or ACE’s) can impact students, the challenges for both students and teachers alike can be magnified. Taken in combination with the myriad of other ways that students differ, it is important that teachers have a plan for how they will understand the needs of learners with complex needs and respond compassionately so that all students remain connected to their schooling experience.

Creating Compassionate Schools will provide teachers an overview of the rationale for embracing pedagogical strategies rooted in compassion. The course has been developed to introduce educators to the principles and practices of an approach that takes im at “getting it right” for both students and their teachers. Creating Compassionate Schools will provide an introductory look at the scientific research-base emerging from a number of disciplines (e.g., social services, education research, neurobiology, public health approaches) in support of compassionate schooling. With compassion as a lens through which professionals can view their work, a number of topics such as professional learning communities, action research and job satisfaction will be explored. Implications of the approach will be discussed as well as barriers to implementation.

Attention will also be devoted to considering the shifting educational landscape as legislative efforts to increase the prominence of social and emotional learning (SEL) standards across K-12 settings are occurring. The defining characteristics of Compassionate Schools will be considered along with characteristics of other movements such as Positive Behavior and Instructional Supports (PBIS), Differentiated Instruction (DI) and Whole Child Education. Exemplars of states operating in alignment with compassionate schooling principles will included.

Teachers responding to the needs of a diverse learning population that include such variables often feel unprepared and isolated. Attempts to connect with colleagues and others within their educational context can yield limited results. Creating Compassionate Schools will also include resources for reflecting on the level of complexity present in classrooms today. Research-based information and strategies will provide course participants with:

  1. a pedagogical framework which recognizes a definition of student diversity that includes students impacted by adverse childhood experiences,
  2. strategies for professionals attempting to meet the immediate needs of learners impacted by adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s),
  3. tools which teachers may use immediately within a compassionate approach, and
  4. strategies and tools for engaging colleagues to respond similarly so that a culture of care is the long-term result in educational settings where children with complex needs are served.
Designed with a K-12 professional audience in mind, Creating Compassionate Schools offers insight into challenges faced by professionals across the educational spectrum in identifying, addressing, and collaborating around the complex needs of students.

Course Objectives:

  • Distinguish between “empathy” and “compassion” within the school setting
  • Understand the role compassionate schooling plays within the broad context of school reform
  • Consider legislative efforts reflecting increased awareness of need for social emotional learning standards (SEL) nationwide
  • Understand the concerns some professionals may have regarding creating compassionate schools
  • Locate information on rationale for compassionate schools that supports a balanced reform approach
  • Understand the philosophical framework that supports the compassionate schooling approach
  • Locate and access best practice government resources relevant to social emotional learning and concepts associated with compassionate schooling
  • Utilize a self-reflection tool to determine the current level of implementation of social emotional learning for the course participant’s context.
  • Learn a working definition of a “compassionate school”
  • Understand how different movements (e.g., Differentiation Instruction, PBIS, SEL) fit with a compassionate schooling approach
  • Identify characteristics of positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS) that may already exist in teaching context
  • Understand and assess for level of evidence of social and emotional learning (SEL) within current teaching context
  • Review one state’s model for supporting school districts to implement compassionate schools.
  • Identify barriers to creating compassionate schools
  • Understand the significance of the concept of a “standard of care” within educational settings
  • Articulate the ways in which creating a compassionate school demonstrates a professional “standard of care”
  • Understand the basis for a shift from reliance on educational labels toward understanding learner complexity
  • Consider how professional responses to student needs can alleviate or increase student needs
  • Identify one state-level attempt to implement social emotional learning (SEL) standards
  • Understand and apply terminology of “compassion satisfaction” and “compassion fatigue” to their own work context
  • Apply a specific reflection strategy that demonstrates understanding of the challenges associated with serving students with complex needs
  • Understand the significance of students feeling connected to their school experience.
  • Recognize the degree to which adverse childhood experiences create disconnects for learners as they experience school
  • Review importance of complying with mandatory reporting requirements
  • Understand the ways in which students who have experienced adverse childhood experiences are in “triple jeopardy”
  • Discern the difference between behavioral forms and behavioral functions
  • Validate the need for professions to listen for a student’s “voice” through their behaviors
  • Understand how an increased awareness of the impact of maltreatment reinforces the need for brain-compatible learning approaches
  • Understand the educational significance of the current scientific research on the impacts of adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s)
  • Understand how ACE’s can potentially increase complexities for students, parents, and professionals, and communities
  • Develop awareness of a tool for assessing individual and collective (eg, classroom, school) levels of student maltreatment and ACE’s.
  • Conduct a survey of colleagues on the concept of ACE’s and report observations demonstrating understanding of concepts
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect on your own level of ACE’s and how this may influence your interactions with students
  • Distinguish characteristics of “good stress” and “bad stress” and how these impact capacity to learn
  • Locate resources that could be useful in identifying characteristics of students experiencing childhood traumatic stress
  • Learn basic components of effective engagement with students who are currently experiencing varying levels of stress
  • Demonstrate understanding of course concepts by completing a functional based assessment on a particular student
  • Interpret information about the negative impacts of early adversity and “toxic stress levels” and apply this information to current teaching context
  • Articulate different types of trauma and how they might impact educational routines
  • Implement a “compassionate schooling action plan” at the individual, classroom, or school level and provide evidence of impact.
  • Demonstrate understanding of core compassionate school concepts through submission of personal teaching philosophy statement reflecting course concepts

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will need to do the exercises, complete the online assignments, and post responses that are indicated to the forum for feedback. In addition, participants will be expected to apply certain skills-building exercises in their own setting and report the results of that to the forum. Participation is necessary for passing the course.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students are eligible only for “P” in-service credit.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1: WHY COMPASSIONATE SCHOOLS ARE NEEDED
    • Introduction
    • 1.a Concerned About Compassion?
    • 1.b Addressing Concern # 1: Compassionate Schooling is Unscientific
    • 1.c Addressing Concern # 2: Compassionate Schooling is a Distraction from “Real Reform”?
    • 1.d Understanding How Reform Efforts Move at the Speed of Relationships
    • 1.e When Relationships Slow to a Crawl
    • 1.f Addressing Concern #3: Can Educators Opt Out of the Compassionate Schooling Approach?
    • 1.g Compassion Helps Frame “The Big Picture”
  • Lesson 2: WHAT IS A COMPASSIONATE SCHOOL?
    • 2.a Characteristics of Compassionate Schooling
    • 2.b Principles of Compassionate Schooling
    • 2.c A Working Definition of a Compassionate School
    • 2.d Barriers to Creating Compassionate Schools
  • Lesson 3: COMMON CARE STANDARDS
    • 3.a Common CARE Standards
    • 3.b What is Education’s “Standard of Care”?
    • 3.c Why A “Duty To Care” Will Not Satisfy
    • 3.d Compassion Is Fueled by Curiosity
    • 3.e Compassion Anticipates the Essential Questions of the Learner’s Heart
  • Lesson 4: COMPASSION HONORS THE COMPLEXITY OF DIVERSITY
    • 4.a Compassion Honors the Complexity of Diversity
    • 4.b Complexity in the Context of Compassion
    • 4.c Complexity is a Moving Target for Compassion
    • 4.d The Core of a Compassionate School Professional
    • 4.e What Kinds of Problems Does Compassion Solve?
  • Lesson 5: COMPASSION CREATES CONNECTIONS
    • 5.a How the Need for Connectedness Leads Us to Consider Compassion
    • 5.b A Disconnect for Education
    • 5.c Connecting the Disconnected
    • 5.d Compassion Hears a Voice Through Behavior
    • 5.e How Compassion Helps Professionals Learn
  • Lesson 6: UNDERSTANDING ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACE’S)
    • 6.a Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE’s)
    • 6.b Findings of the ACE Study
    • 6.c Reflecting on the Meaning of ACE’s
    • 6.d How Becoming ACE’s-aware Challenges and Changes Us
    • 6.e Implications of ACE’s Research for Educators
    • 6.f How Being ACE-informed Increases Protective Factors
  • Midterm
  • Lesson 7: HOW STRESS AND TRAUMA IMPACT LEARNING
    • 7.a Stress In Context
    • 7.b Understanding “Good Stress” and “Bad Stress”
    • 7.c The Impact of Stress On Learning
    • 7.d Trauma Is Sometimes the Elusive “Something Else”
    • 7.e How Stress Impacts Us Physiologically
    • 7.f Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    • 7.g Our Brains are a “Driving” Force
    • 7.h Does All Stress Lead to Trauma?
    • 7i Strategies That Promote a Culture of Calm
  • Lesson 8: MOVING AT THE SPEED OF RELATIONSHIPS
    • 8.a The Importance of Sharing Power with Learners
    • 8.b Improving Our Relationships with Learners
    • 8.c Course Conclusion
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

If you need "P-Credits" from the NYC DOE ASPDP please go to http://www.cecreditsonline.org/ASPDP.

CE Credits Online Anytime-Anywhere

  • Standards-based 
  • University credits available* 
  • Asynchronous – start at any time – 24/7
  • Self-paced – work at your own pace and convenience 
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills 

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliations page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Teaching English Language Learners: An Introduction

  • $249 through July 31, 2015
  • Use promo code July15 at checkout

Newsletter


CE Credits Online is pleased to announce it is launching the CE Credits Online Monthly Newsletter. Every month the newsletter will offer a discount on one or more CE Credits Online courses—often with savings that can amount to hundreds of dollars. The only way to receive these discounts (using a promotional code) is to receive the newsletter. The newsletter is free and will have various features we believe will be of interest to all educators.

Once you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive a confirmation email and a link to the CE Credits Online Newsletter and the discounts that are being offered for that month. Discounts change monthly.

Click Here to Sign Up.

*Does not apply to all districts

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • This course was phenomenal in touching on all of the areas that teachers can create a compassionate school and school connectedness. In my school specifically, we have a great challenge in creating a school-wide connectedness and level of openness and compassion, due to the size of our school. We have almost 2,000 students and almost 250 staff members. All staff members should know what they can do to impact the school and create the highest level of education for our students. I learned what kind of techniques, plans and practices I can implement into my classroom. Through this course I was able to apply these to my classroom like creating an ICARE plan, considering ACE scores and traumas, etc and I feel my relationship between my students has changed. I am more considerate to my students and their prior experiences. I also stress the importance of their participation within the community. I plan to continue to implement such practices for the betterment of my students and school community.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • I believe this course has changed my mindset to be more compassionate towards my students and digging deeper into their ACE scores to help address both their academic and emotional needs. This course has forced me to recognize that teaching is not all about academic needs but showing empathy and understanding towards my students, which will hopefully open doors or motivate students to progress academically. In addition this course has encouraged me to work with the school based support staff to form plans to help my students to have high ACE scores.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • I really enjoyed taking this course, I learned a lot from it and have already and will continue to implement strategies I have learned in my own classroom. I have learned a lot from taking this course. As I have stated in my many of my forums and journal reflections, as an educator compassion is a MUST. As a teacher in district 75, in a school in a high-risk neighborhood, many of my students do not get that compassion outside of school. Taking this course reinforced of how important it is they get that compassion when they are in school, and that school is a place they feel safe, a place where they look forward to going, a place they see as positive, a place where they enjoy learning, and feel accepted, cared for, and that their unmet needs are met. Taking this course allowed me to reflect on myself as an educator, and simply as an individual. All of my students have behaviors, but now I take a step back to reflect on other underlying reasons to why this student is demonstrating a particular behavior that day; Do they simply just not what to do the work? Or are they suffering some sort of trauma and stress, and are unable to cope with the stress in a positive way? I will continue to practice these strategies in my classroom and pass along what I have learned to my colleagues.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • This was a very interesting class for me to take as a new teacher because I always considered this to be a main goal of a teacher. But so often we get caught up in test scores and other everyday tasks that it is easy to forget the bigger picture. We are here to serve our students and build our communities. Im glad I was able to take this course and to implement so many community building tactics into my classroom so early on in my career. Art is such a special topic in that can be really emotional for students and so its even more important for me to take into consideration the lives my students live outside of my classroom. I have such a strong power in that I can help students who might be struggling at home feel empowered to share or heal in a way that might not be possible for them in science or math class. It is my obligation to let students breath and share and live in my classroom in a way that they feel respected and important and listened to. I appreciate what the course has taught me in terms of building more understanding for my students and their emotions.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • This course was a very valuable learning experience and opened my eyes to many new things. One thing that this course has pushed me to do more is to collaborate more with my colleagues in order to make our school as compassionate as possible. I will continue to differentiate instruction and adapt instruction to suit the various needs of my students, which was an essential learning in this course. In addition, I will continue to be consistent and always stay true to my word so that my students develop a strong sense of trust with me and feel both safe and comfortable in my classroom. The biggest thing that this course taught me is to be sure that when a child is acting out or behaving inappropriately that I first think about what may have happened to the child, before thinking “what is wrong with this child”. It is important to learn about what adverse experiences my students may have encountered which may affect their behavior in the classroom. I thoroughly enjoying this course and felt that I learned a lot of important skills and concepts that I can use in my own practice.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • In this course i have learned that creating compassionate schooling is a process of changing your mindset and thinking more about the children. I have learned that compassion is a human quality of understanding the suffering of others paired with a desire to help that person overcome the fear or traumatic experience. I have learned that children come to school with all kinds of issues and we as professionals need to be prepared and aware of the situations and why they may be reacting that way. In my practice I have learned to now think before i speak and evaluate th situation of why they are reacting that way instead of yelling and having a professional trantrum myself.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • This course has given me much time to reflect on the emotional side of my students. I have realized that without addressing their emotional needs, there will be no learning going on in the classroom. I really feel that it is important to teach the whole child and to really focus on the emotional needs of each student. This course has opened my eyes to all the different traumatic things that a child goes through in their life, and then I expect them to sit and listen and learn during the day, when they are worried about so much more. During the summer, i want to come up with good strategies and activities through role playing to really foster a nurturing environment in my classroom.

    What a participant from New York said about Creating Compassionate Schools For NYCDOEASPDP
  • Wow! I really enjoyed this course. The availablity for me to work at my own pace over the summer was just what I needed. I really enjoyed the format that was used in the lessons that were presented. The refresher course on the history of education and the impact that leaders have had on our educational system was very intersting to me. There is so much that you forget after you have graduated from college and moved out into the working environment. It was a trip going down memory lane to go back and think through the theories of great minds such as those of Piaget, Maslow, Erickson, Vygotsky, Gardner and Kohlberg. I still struggle with the No Child Left Behind law. I live and teach in Alaska. Our geographics is much different from that of other states. There are many communities (villages) and teachers within these communities that struggle to meet the requirements for this law. I do appreciate this being a topic that was touched upon at the end of this course. Thank you.

    What a participant from Alaska said about Today's Classroom: Foundations of and Current Trends in Education
  • Although the one student I work one-on-one with as a teacher and counselor is in the Emotionally Handicap Program (now titled "The Comprehensive Support Program"), the setting up part of classroom rules lessons work well with my student. I know, as mentioned in the lessons, that this program was not designed for the extreme cases I work with but know that a very good portion can be applied for such special needs students. I have spoke to some colleagues about this program and will recommend it to them. I did enjoy taking this course. I felt very at ease with it. I like how I could go back and re-read certain parts of the lessons with ease. This course was very user-friendly.                                

    What a participant from Arizona said about Stopping Disruptive Behavior
  • I really enjoyed the videos. They were very well done and easy to follow and understand. I could take what I learned and apply it immediately to my own instruction.                                  

    What a participant from Arizona said about Transforming Math Instruction with Interactive Whiteboard Systems