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Maximizing Engagement of All Learners

Price

Maximizing Engagement of All Learners

Humboldt County Office of Education

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
What you need to know

CE Credits Online and Humboldt County Office of Education are pleased to offer you discounted pricing for online professional development courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.

Join other Humboldt County Office of Education educators in taking online coursework for discounted tuition!

Humboldt State University (HSU): HSU offers post baccalaureate, 700 level credits for all CE Credits Online courses.

If you have questions, please contact:

Colby Smart at Humboldt County Office of Education

CE Credits Online

University Credit Request
CE Credits Online is the course provider and Humboldt State University is the accrediting institution. The HSU Office of Extended Education issues the university credit, and there is a fee of $50 per credit. Upon completion of your course, you have two weeks to apply and pay for university credit. University credit fees are not included in the price listed. Once we have verified that all your coursework is completed and approved, and we have received the credit fees, your paperwork, along with the fees, will be sent to Humboldt State University for processing at the end of each month. The processing of your credits can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of your request.

For more information visit our University Affiliations page.
*(University Credits are available for an additional fee.)

  • Standards-based
  • University credits available (Humboldt State University*)
  • Preferred tuition available for Humboldt County Office of Education
  • Asynchronous – start at any time
  • Self-paced – work at your own convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code!
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education
Course Description

Course Description:

As teachers begin teaching within the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) framework they will quickly recognize an even greater emphasis needs to be placed on student engagement. There is widespread recognition that teachers are tasked with creating favorable learning conditions for a diverse population of learners. Teaching within the CCSS framework requires teachers to create equity of outcomes as well as equity of access to learning. In order for teachers to move deeper into teaching within the CCSS it is important that they develop a solid understanding of the underlying principles of the CCSS and how maximizing student engagement is an essential part of teaching effectively within the Common Core State Standards.

To maximize engagement for all learners, teachers will learn the importance of recognizing the “achievement gap” is widened by an “engagement gap” at the individual student level. Course participants will learn that teachers and learners may view engagement through the lens of different enduring questions. When answering the enduring questions of learners, teachers will learn how to avoid various engagement traps. An important aspect of maximization will be to assess students with regard to their own orientation toward growth as learners. The negative implications of students holding a fixed view of their own potential as learners will be juxtaposed against a learning mindset that helps increase student willingness to take risks. The connection between students embracing an expandable view of their ability followed by teacher use of prescriptive teacher feedback will be made.

Throughout the course teachers will have opportunities to reflect on their own cycle of inquiry and demonstrate an impact on the achievement of students through engagement. In doing this, a number of factors will be considered including how universal design for learning principles can help address barriers within the learning conditions. The rationale for personalization through a continuous cycle of re-engagement for teachers and students will be provided. Teacher reflection strategies to guide interpretation of both overt and covert student disengagement will provide teachers an opportunity to implement what they are learning.

This course has been designed with the goal of (1) providing a framework which operationally defines engagement and promotes the value of maximizing engagement for all learners (2) provides research-based principles in which teachers can anchor their practices and (3) the characteristics of engagement-minded practices which both teachers and students will find motivating to implement that will leverage the efforts of both teacher-students. The educational literature increasingly underscores the importance of professionals understanding, anticipating and responding to the needs of students so that quality engagement is the predominant experience of students.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • Summarize the current need for personalization within a standards-based system
  • Be able to define the difference between the “achievement gap” and the “engagement gap.”
  • Articulate why what teachers do (“teaching”) and what students do (“learning”) are not equivalent.
  • Understand the need for developing a gauge for engagement
  • Recognize why maximizing engagement for all learners requires extensive interactions with learners
  • Apply a number of potential pitfalls related to engagement (gaps, traps, wraps, and naps)
  • Demonstrate understanding of the need to formulate an engagement hypothesis
  • Review current research on the role of emotions in learning
  • Develop awareness of elements of a brain-friendly learning environment
  • Distinguishing between “good stress” and “bad stress” levels that impact learning
  • Comprehend the role of fear for learners and strategies to help mitigate fear
  • Understand the elements of and a rationale for a student engagement self-reflection tool
  • Articulate the enduring questions for both teachers and learners and the pivotal nature of students’ enduring questions
  • Identification of the features of a cycle of inquiry and the importance of using one to increase student engagement
  • Conceptualize success in teaching as interdependent with success of learners
  • Recognize the importance of connecting with students to develop strong teacher-student relationships
  • List characteristics of learning environments that alter the odds against or in favor of learning
  • Demonstrate understanding that a teacher’s role is multi-faceted as an advocate, buffer and catalyst within the learning environment.
  • Delineate the characteristics of a fixed ability mindset and an expandable ability mindset
  • Recognize how a growth-minded approach is integral to maximizing engagement for all learners regardless of academic achievement levels
  • Implement a teacher reflection strategy to determine whether student orientation is toward a fixed or expandable view of ability
  • Prepare a lesson or unit of instruction on the growth mindset for an entire class
  • Link the key teacher behavior of providing prescriptive feedback with the need for learners to receive informative communication during their learning process
  • Learn steps to providing effective prescriptive feedback.
  • Recognize the research base that suggests particular kinds of praise can actually decrease engagement
  • Understand the benefits of providing prescriptive feedback
  • Understand the significance of encouraging student ownership of data about their own performance
  • Learn several methods for providing students opportunities to reflect on their own performance data over time
  • Describe the statements that may be typical of myths associated with engagement
  • Reflect on any overlap between current practice and engagement myths
  • Understand the role of behavior as a language for learners trying to get unmet needs through their behavior
  • Recognize the covert and overt aspects of behavior and the challenges each can present for teachers maximizing engagement
  • Reflect on course content and applications to current teaching context
  • Create an engagement map to guide future learning interests
Syllabus
  • Instructor:
    Steve Dahl
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Number of Credits:
    3 semester credits / 4 quarter credits / 45 hours

Course Description:

As teachers begin teaching within the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) framework they will quickly recognize an even greater emphasis needs to be placed on student engagement. There is widespread recognition that teachers are tasked with creating favorable learning conditions for a diverse population of learners. Teaching within the CCSS framework requires teachers to create equity of outcomes as well as equity of access to learning. In order for teachers to move deeper into teaching within the CCSS it is important that they develop a solid understanding of the underlying principles of the CCSS and how maximizing student engagement is an essential part of teaching effectively within the Common Core State Standards.

To maximize engagement for all learners, teachers will learn the importance of recognizing the “achievement gap” is widened by an “engagement gap” at the individual student level. Course participants will learn that teachers and learners may view engagement through the lens of different enduring questions. When answering the enduring questions of learners, teachers will learn how to avoid various engagement traps. An important aspect of maximization will be to assess students with regard to their own orientation toward growth as learners. The negative implications of students holding a fixed view of their own potential as learners will be juxtaposed against a learning mindset that helps increase student willingness to take risks. The connection between students embracing an expandable view of their ability followed by teacher use of prescriptive teacher feedback will be made.

Throughout the course teachers will have opportunities to reflect on their own cycle of inquiry and demonstrate an impact on the achievement of students through engagement. In doing this, a number of factors will be considered including how universal design for learning principles can help address barriers within the learning conditions. The rationale for personalization through a continuous cycle of re-engagement for teachers and students will be provided. Teacher reflection strategies to guide interpretation of both overt and covert student disengagement will provide teachers an opportunity to implement what they are learning.

This course has been designed with the goal of (1) providing a framework which operationally defines engagement and promotes the value of maximizing engagement for all learners (2) provides research-based principles in which teachers can anchor their practices and (3) the characteristics of engagement-minded practices which both teachers and students will find motivating to implement that will leverage the efforts of both teacher-students. The educational literature increasingly underscores the importance of professionals understanding, anticipating and responding to the needs of students so that quality engagement is the predominant experience of students.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • Summarize the current need for personalization within a standards-based system
  • Be able to define the difference between the “achievement gap” and the “engagement gap.”
  • Articulate why what teachers do (“teaching”) and what students do (“learning”) are not equivalent.
  • Understand the need for developing a gauge for engagement
  • Recognize why maximizing engagement for all learners requires extensive interactions with learners
  • Apply a number of potential pitfalls related to engagement (gaps, traps, wraps, and naps)
  • Demonstrate understanding of the need to formulate an engagement hypothesis
  • Review current research on the role of emotions in learning
  • Develop awareness of elements of a brain-friendly learning environment
  • Distinguishing between “good stress” and “bad stress” levels that impact learning
  • Comprehend the role of fear for learners and strategies to help mitigate fear
  • Understand the elements of and a rationale for a student engagement self-reflection tool
  • Articulate the enduring questions for both teachers and learners and the pivotal nature of students’ enduring questions
  • Identification of the features of a cycle of inquiry and the importance of using one to increase student engagement
  • Conceptualize success in teaching as interdependent with success of learners
  • Recognize the importance of connecting with students to develop strong teacher-student relationships
  • List characteristics of learning environments that alter the odds against or in favor of learning
  • Demonstrate understanding that a teacher’s role is multi-faceted as an advocate, buffer and catalyst within the learning environment.
  • Delineate the characteristics of a fixed ability mindset and an expandable ability mindset
  • Recognize how a growth-minded approach is integral to maximizing engagement for all learners regardless of academic achievement levels
  • Implement a teacher reflection strategy to determine whether student orientation is toward a fixed or expandable view of ability
  • Prepare a lesson or unit of instruction on the growth mindset for an entire class
  • Link the key teacher behavior of providing prescriptive feedback with the need for learners to receive informative communication during their learning process
  • Learn steps to providing effective prescriptive feedback.
  • Recognize the research base that suggests particular kinds of praise can actually decrease engagement
  • Understand the benefits of providing prescriptive feedback
  • Understand the significance of encouraging student ownership of data about their own performance
  • Learn several methods for providing students opportunities to reflect on their own performance data over time
  • Describe the statements that may be typical of myths associated with engagement
  • Reflect on any overlap between current practice and engagement myths
  • Understand the role of behavior as a language for learners trying to get unmet needs through their behavior
  • Recognize the covert and overt aspects of behavior and the challenges each can present for teachers maximizing engagement
  • Reflect on course content and applications to current teaching context
  • Create an engagement map to guide future learning interests

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will engage in a variety of activities to learn, practice, and apply the skills outlined in the course. This will include workbook exercises, short answers that are reviewed by a moderator, quizzes, the development of written lessons using differentiated strategies, classroom implementation of these strategies, and analysis of both the lesson and the students’ response to the lesson. A final exam is also a part of the course. Participation in all of these areas is necessary for students to successfully complete the course with a passing grade.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see University Affiliations under the Information Center for the cost per credit.

Content Outline/Topics

  • Lesson 1: Maximizing Student Engagement
    • 1 Introduction
    • 1.a Framing Student Engagement
    • 1.b Understanding Personalization
    • 1.c Start Where Your Learners Are
  • Lesson 2: There is an Engagement Gap to Bridge
    • 2.a There is an Engagement Gap to Bridge
    • 2.b Maxims or Myths?
    • 2.c How Engagement Helps Define Us
    • 2.d Toward a Working Definition of Engagement
  • Lesson 3: Formulating an Engagement Hypothesis
    • 3.a Formulating an Engagement Hypothesis
    • 3.b The Engagement Apps (Applications)
    • 3.c The Engagement Trap
    • 3.d Avoiding the Engagement Trap
    • 3.e Creating an Engagement Map
    • 3.f The Engagement Landscape
  • Lesson 4: The Teacher’s Role: Engaging the Learner to Self-Engage
    • 4.a The Teacher’s Role: Engaging the Learner to Self-Engage
    • 4.b Emotions and Learning
    • 4.c What You Can Do To Drive Out Fear
    • 4.d The Enduring Questions About Engagement
  • Lesson 5: The Importance of School Connectedness
    • 5.a The Importance of School Connectedness
    • 5.b Data Suggests That Relationships Matter
    • 5.c Why Strive to Maximize Engagement for All Learners?
  • Lesson 6: Growth-minded Engagement
    • 6.a Growth-minded Engagement
    • 6.b Paying Attention to Intelligence
    • 6.c Paying Attention to Effort
    • 6.d Preparing to Teach Students to Maximize Their Own Growth
  • Lesson 7: Providing Feedback to Maximize Engagement for All Learners
    • 7.a Providing Feedback to Maximize Engagement for All Learners
    • 7.b Midterm
  • Lesson 8: Helping Students Own the Learning Process
    • 8.a Helping Students Own The Learning Process
    • 8.b Helping Students See the Learning Process
    • 8.c How Students Can Take Ownership of Their Learning Process
    • 8.d Road Map to Formative Assessment
  • Lesson 9: Engagement Myths
    • 9.a Many Myths of Engagement
    • 9.b The BIG Myth of Disengagement
    • 9.c Reframing Behavior in Terms of Engagement
    • 9.d When Student Disengagement is Covert
  • Lesson 10: MEAL: A Taste of Things to Come
    • 10.a MEAL: A Taste of Things to Come
    • 10.b Educational Neuroscience Will Help Inform Practice
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

We are affiliated with the Humboldt State University (HSU), part of the California State University System, located in Arcata, CA.

Approved for graduate level semester credits

  • 45 hours = 3 semester credits
  • 30 hours = 2 semester credits
  • 15 hours = 1 semester credit

Receiving HSU Semester Credit: On or about the 1st and the 16th of every month CECO submits completion paperwork to HSU along with the participant’s fee of $50 per credit. Processing the credits through HSU can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of the initial credit request. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Save 15% on any course through 6/29/2017


  • 15% Off until 6/29/2017
  • Use promo code:
  • SummerSpecial17
  • at checkout

*Not available in all districts.

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • This course offered many insights and explanations of how to motivate and maximize the engagement of all learners. The first thing I need to do is have a conversation with the student, and have them tell me about their own levels of engagement. Once this is established, I should introduce the BRAINS activity, which I’ve used and will continue to use in future years. When the students are self-aware of their own engagement, true learning can take place. I also learned about certain brain activity and what happens in the brain when a student is stressed. I will use those videos and teach students that they have a growing mind. When students can truly open their mind to learning, they will be engaged and see value in taking responsibility for their own education. Most importantly, I will use student data to evaluate my lessons and engagement in class and go back to the planning process if I need to, in order to close the engagement gap and get higher achievement results.

    What a participant from Arizona said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • This course really had me evaluate where I am currently in my teaching. I liked how I was able to consider my students in response to the course information. This course helped me make changes in how I am setting up my classroom lessons to better help my students and I am already seeing improvements in my relationships with students and their relationship with the material. The moderator's further questions helped me focus better on the material and to specify my response to the questions.                                

    What a participant from Arizona said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • This course has helped me maximize the engagement of all my learners in my History classes. I learned about the Fixed vs. Growth mindset. I never knew I was limiting the learning potential of my students by labeling them as "the smart one" or the "perfect student" in class. I never knew that my putting labels on my students that prevented them from taking risk with their education because they feel like they wouldn't belong in the category I put them. I learned about the barriers we often put up as teachers without realizing we might be alienating a segment of the class. I learned about many strategies such at the B.R.A.I.N.S. to help students re-enage in our lesson and feel confident about learning.

    What a participant from California said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I learned and thought about many important ideas over the course of this class. Some of the ideas discussed I was somewhat familiar with, but many others were entirely new to me. Some of the most important ideas that I will apply in my own classroom involve creating a learning environment where students feel comfortable taking risks when it comes to their own learning. Students need to be aware of their own learning process and need to be willing to share it with me. One concrete strategy that I will use is the BRAINS check worksheet. I think that this will be important in moving my students to higher-level critical thinking skills. This also reminded my of a student data collection sheet that I have used infrequently in the past, but that gets students to metacognate and to think about why they excelled or struggled with a particular assignment. One thing that really stuck with me in this class is the importance of having a comfortable, safe environment for students to work in. I work in a school with great socio-economic diversity, and many students are struggling with issues such as poverty or substance abuse. Many students experience toxic stress in their lives through no fault of their own. The least that I can do is to provide students with a safe space, even if it is just for an hour a day. I have always been aware of the importance of good teacher/student relationships, but this lesson really emphasized just how crucial it can be for struggling or potentially struggling students. I also learned much more about the fixed vs. growth mindset theory developed by Dr. Dweck. This course allowed me to think of and design more concrete ways to weave a growth mindset into my curriculum. The battle to overcome fixed mindsets and to invest students in their own learning may be long and difficult, but it is definitely a battle that needs to be waged to help craft independent, critical-thinking, lifelong learners.

    What a participant from California said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • A major eye opener for me was to learn about the engagement gap. Obviously there are students in every classroom, that are disengaged with the lesson, and many times those students are the same ones that are always disengaged. However, I have learned that there are many other students who may also not be as fully engaged as they appear to be. I have learned that by "handing the problem back" to the students, and giving them the chance to analyze their engagement and be in control of their learning, they can be successful. That may be one of the most useful and important things I learned- that students are in charge of their own learning, and as the teacher it is my job to facilitate their learning. I very much enjoyed learning about the way our brains work. The videos were helpful to teach the way young minds form synapses- but also how experiences in early life affect the way the brain works. I believe this is very helpful information to a teacher who cares about each student and is always trying to find ways to help them succeed. Growth mindset vs. fixed mind set are also subjects that have been interesting for me to learn and apply in my classroom, to help my students understand that they can be successful, even if something is hard.

    What a participant from Idaho said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I enjoyed the course. I really liked the videos and interactive assignments, as well as the journal entries and topics. I felt like there was quite a bit of reading on some of the handouts, that I would've liked to be just summaries, and main points. But that was a minor thing, and overall the course was very well designed.

    What a participant from Idaho said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • Through this course I have learned so much. I have been in the field of education for 38 years-and I am still a learner. The emphasis of this course was to have us become aware of different strategies that we as individual teachers can use in our classrooms to create learning conditions to capture the engagement of all students. From this course I am taking away key concepts on creating better tools in which my students can self-access and self evaluate themselves. With the knowledge gained through this course my students will have an even better understanding of the importance of why data needs to be collected (formative and summative)to my students. Why it is important to give immediate feedback and discuss that feedback. Why students need to self-access and self-reflect. My students will have a better understanding of the importance of our classroom relationships and how that only magnifies their engagement and performance in the classroom. This class has given me many opportunities to enhance my teaching methods when I return to my students in the fall. It is a win-win situation for my students and myself.

    What a participant from Illinois said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I was very excited to take this course because as a teacher I am constantly frustrated with trying to engage and motivate all of my students and not being successful. This course has given me insight and tools to start the school year off on a different path. Right away I was captured by the change of thinking from: if I teach, students should learn, to: if I provide conditions to learning that match all learners needs then the learner can engage in their learning. This reinforces my thought that teachers are more facilitators to students' learning and we need to develop learning opportunities to engage our learners. Next school year, I will focus on developing learning opportunities that will engage all my students. Another tie into this idea is the concept of the brain that does the work is the brain that learns. This is important to develop engaging activities where the student has ownership of the end product. This idea will also change the way in which I develop my learning opportunities to provide more hands-on discovery moments. Another area that caught my attention was the idea of students' self-disclosure and the idea that as teachers, we generally fly in the dark with respect to student engagement. This course has changed my perception of what engagement looks like and how to empower students to be self-aware of their engagement levels, their achievements and their growth. I plan on using the high five engagement tool, give specific feedback on their achievements and give them an opportunity to see their growth through pre and post data that students will learn to calculate on their own. This leads into the final area of Dr. Carol Dweck's concept of growth mindset. It amazes me how many of my students have a fixed mindset and this course has given me tools to help students move from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. I think it needs to start at the beginning of the school year by introducing the concept of a growth mindset, through activities, to our students. In the future having this in my mind, I know my students need to hear, see and experience prescriptive feedback that affirms their success. This idea needs to be reinforced throughout the school year. Praise effort, not ability.

    What a participant from Illinois said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I have learned a lot about the importance of brain research on education. A paradigm shift needs to happen in the world of education to focus more on the learner as a learner instead of instruction and theories for methods instruction. Specific teaching needs to occur with students on brain science so that they understand that they have a role in learning and that as they stretch themselves, apply themselves and stay engaged with their studies, their brain connections also grow. Attention to the emotional needs of children is also lacking, but extremely important. The importance of feedback and "feedforward" was a new thought for me as well.

    What a participant from Iowa said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I felt this course was very helpful and applicable to the real world classroom. I often feel classes are theoretical, this one is actually applicable. There are several strategies and studies that we have studied to apply to our classrooms. I believe there are several of these techniques that I already use parts of, for example the growth mind set. I believe the students have the capabilities to expand their learning capacities, limited only by their biological makeup, and the chemical changes that took place in their brains due to trauma, and other abusive/destructive situations. I believe this information will continue to be applied in my classroom, and continue to be part of my classroom applications. I currently encourage students in my class, but I am now particularly aware of the type of encouragement I am giving. I make sure it is not the mindless “good job” praise that so often has slipped from my mouth, with good intentions, but possibly undermining the student’s motivation and internal drive to complete studies in a manner that will push them to continue to grow. In this course, I have learned strategies that I can apply, some that don’t work in our particular situation, and others that we are already utilizing that I was just made more keenly aware of, and took a closer look at. This has been a very informative class for me, and I have enjoyed it.

    What a participant from Iowa said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners