Libraries

Reading / Language Arts

Instructional Strategies

English Language Learners

Transforming Instruction with Technology

Classroom Management / Creating Effective Learning Environments

Beginning Teachers

Special Education

School-wide Programs – Title I, Part A

Counselors

Support Staff

Customized Libraries

Highly Qualified Teacher Title II, Part A

Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom

Price

Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom

Western Oregon University

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
  • Hours: 45.00
  • University Credits: 3.00
  • Promotions
What you need to know

CE Credits Online Courses Have Been Approved for Academic Credits through Western Oregon University

  • Start anytime and work at your own convenience
  • Available 24/7 from any computer with Internet access
  • One-on-one facilitation

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Western Oregon University (WOU): WOU offers post baccalaureate, 600 graduate level credits based on the quarter system. The tuition cost is $50 per credit, plus a $10 processing fee, payable to CE Credits Online.

  • Step 1:Select your course(s) from the catalog tab above and enroll following the onscreen instructions.
  • Step 2: To request Western Oregon University (WOU) Credits:
    Western Oregon University Registration Form

    If you want WOU credit for the CE Credits Online course, you are required to submit a registration form for the course within 2 weeks of starting the class. Located on your “Student Homepage” (after you enroll) you will find a Request University Credit section under Obtaining Credits. You will select Western Oregon University and follow the instructions for requesting and paying for your WOU credits.

    To ensure that you receive credit for a specific quarter, your request, registration form and payment need to be received 20 days before the end of that quarter or the first of the month, whichever one is earlier. For example if the quarter ends on June 10th we would need to receive your request, registration form and payment by May 22nd.
  • Step 3: Once the credit fee has been paid, your completion paperwork and WOU registration will be submitted to WOU 18 days prior to the quarter ending. Allow three weeks after the end of the quarter before requesting an official or unofficial transcript.
Quarter Ending date
Fall 2012 12/13/2013
Winter 2014 03/21/2014
Spring 2014 06/17/2014
Summer 2014 08/15/2014

You can find directions for requesting an official transcript on the Western Oregon University Registrar page.

Western Oregon DEP contact information
Division of Extended Programs
Western Oregon University
345 N Monmouth Ave.
Monmouth, OR 97361
Phone: 1-800-451-5767
Fax: 503-838-8473
Email: extend@wou.edu

Western Oregon University Registration Form
If you want WOU credit for the course, the Division of Extended Programs (DEP) of Western Oregon University requires completed DEP registration forms. CE Credits Online will submit your course completion paperwork for each CE Credits Online course. Please print the Western Oregon University Registration Form and complete items #1-15, skip #14 Method of Payment. Sign and date on #16 and fax to CE Credits Online 1-425-844-4164 or mail to:

CE Credits Online
Attention: Sandra Blazevich
23224 NE 156th PL.
Woodinville, WA. 98077

CE Credits Online can not process your academic credit request without the completed Western Oregon University DEP registration form. If you have any questions please contact DEP office or visit the website: http://www.wou.edu/provost/extprogram/creditoverlay_CEONLINE.php.

Course Description

Course Description:

Student populations in schools today are very diverse. Students differ in their readiness to learn, the ways in which they prefer to learn, and the areas of interest that motivate their learning. Differentiated instruction is based on the belief that classrooms where students are active learners, active inquirers, and active problem solvers are more effective than those where students passively receive a “one-size-fits-all” curriculum.

This course introduces teachers to instructional strategies and methodologies that will enable them to create powerful learning experiences to meet the wide range of different student needs in their classrooms.

School improvement plans in virtually every school, regardless of grade level configuration, underscore the importance of helping all students achieve academic success and meet educational standards. It is clear from the research that the intentional use of differentiated instruction strategies is highly effective in meeting diverse learner needs and positively impacting student achievement.

This course focuses on best practices in differentiation and provides teachers with the knowledge and skills they need to implement these methods in their own classrooms. Through learning activities, and the practice and application of skills, participants gain new levels of expertise which will enable them to create instructional experiences in an engaging classroom atmosphere to help all of their students reach their full potential.

Course Objectives:

  • Understand the principles of differentiated instruction
  • Learn the components of learning style and their applications in the classroom
  • Understand how enduring understanding, student engagement, student outcomes, and teacher behaviors that cause learning to happen are critical elements of differentiated instruction
  • Practice designing multiple paths to reach a specific learning objective
  • Create lessons that differentiate content, process, and product
  • Learn how to differentiate instruction to meet diverse student learning styles, readiness levels, and interests
  • Understand how brain-compatible learning corresponds with differentiated instruction methodologies
  • Design learning activities that increase student engagement by enhancing semantic, episodic, procedural, automatic, and emotional memories
  • Plan lessons that differentiate instruction across four continuums
  • Practice using tiered instruction and anchor activities with flexible groups
  • Design and use essential questions and effective questioning strategies
  • Understand how scaffolding and coaching can assist struggling learners
  • Explore practical ideas for increasing active student participation and using graphic organizers in a whole-class setting
  • Understand how to use assessment as an integral part of instruction in a differentiated classroom
  • Design performance tasks to use as assessment tools
  • Plan and teach lessons based upon enduring understanding that differentiate content, process, and product to meet individual student needs
Syllabus
  • Prerequisites:
    None

Course Description:

Student populations in schools today are very diverse. Students differ in their readiness to learn, the ways in which they prefer to learn, and the areas of interest that motivate their learning. Differentiated instruction is based on the belief that classrooms where students are active learners, active inquirers, and active problem solvers are more effective than those where students passively receive a "one-size-fits-all" curriculum. This course introduces teachers to instructional strategies and methodologies that will enable them to create powerful learning experiences to meet the wide range of different student needs in their classrooms.

School improvement plans in virtually every school, regardless of grade level configuration, underscore the importance of helping all students achieve academic success and meet educational standards. This can be a challenge due to the wide range of abilities present in today’s schools. It is clear from the research that the intentional use of differentiated instruction strategies is highly effective in meeting diverse learner needs and positively impacting student achievement.

This course focuses on best practices in differentiation and provides teachers with the knowledge and skills they need to implement these methods in their own classrooms. Through learning activities, and the practice and application of skills, participants gain new levels of expertise which will enable them to create instructional experiences in an engaging classroom atmosphere to help all of their students reach their full potential.

Course Objectives:

  • Understand the principles of differentiated instruction
  • Learn the components of learning style and their applications in the classroom
  • Understand how enduring understanding, student engagement, student outcomes, and teacher behaviors that cause learning to happen are critical elements of differentiated instruction
  • Practice designing multiple paths to reach a specific learning objective
  • Create lessons that differentiate content, process, and product
  • Learn how to differentiate instruction to meet diverse student learning styles, readiness levels, and interests
  • Understand how brain-compatible learning corresponds with differentiated instruction methodologies
  • Design learning activities that increase student engagement by enhancing semantic, episodic, procedural, automatic, and emotional memories
  • Plan lessons that differentiate instruction across four continuums
  • Practice using tiered instruction and anchor activities with flexible groups
  • Design and use essential questions and effective questioning strategies
  • Understand how scaffolding and coaching can assist struggling learners
  • Explore practical ideas for increasing active student participation and using graphic organizers in a whole-class setting
  • Understand how to use assessment as an integral part of instruction in a differentiated classroom
  • Design performance tasks to use as assessment tools
  • Plan and teach lessons based upon enduring understanding that differentiate content, process, and product to meet individual student needs

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will engage in a variety of activities to learn, practice, and apply the skills outlined in the course. This will include reflective journal exercises, short answers that are reviewed by a moderator, quizzes, the development of written lessons using differentiated strategies, classroom implementation of these strategies, and analysis of both the lesson and the students’ response to the lesson. A final exam is also a part of the course. Participation in all of these areas is necessary for students to successfully complete the course with a passing grade.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see University Affiliations under the Information Center for the cost per credit.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1
    • Introduction
    • 1.a Overview
    • 1.b Elements of a Differentiated Classroom
  • Lesson 2
    • 2.a Understanding Diverse Student Characteristics
    • 2.b Learning Styles – The Many Elements
    • 2.c Understanding Multiple Intelligences
  • Lesson 3
    • 3a. What’s Your Style?
    • 3b. Learning Styles Favored in a “Typical” Classroom
    • 3c. How Culture Relates to Learning Style
  • Lesson 4
    • 4.a The Many Shapes of Differentiation
    • 4.b Teaching For Enduring Knowledge
    • 4.c Begin With the End In Mind
  • Lesson 5
    • 5.a Taking Different Paths to Get to the Same Place
    • 5.b Differentiating Content, Process, and Product
    • 5.c Responding to Different Levels of Readiness
    • 5.d Responding to Different Interests
    • 5.e Responding to Different Learning Styles
  • Lesson 6
    • 6.a Effective Strategies for Differentiation – An Overview
    • 6.b Effective Strategies for Differentiation – Underlying Principles
    • 6.c Effective Strategies for Differentiation – Specific Approaches
  • Midterm
  • Lesson 7
    • 7.a Understanding Brain – Compatible Learning
    • 7.b Why We Remember – And Why We Forget
    • 7.c How Vivid Lessons Enhance Memory
  • Lesson 8
    • 8.a Differentiating To Meet Readiness Needs
    • 8.b Planning Tiered Instruction
    • 8.c Examples of Tiered Instruction
    • 8.d Using Anchor Activities With Flexible Groups
  • Lesson 9
    • 9.a Differentiating With Your Whole Class
    • 9.b Increasing Active Student Participation
    • 9.c Using Graphic Organizers
    • 9.d Asking Powerful Questions
  • Lesson 10
    • 10.a Assessment in the Differentiated Classroom
    • 10.b Creating Performance Assessments
    • 10.c Scaffolding Performance Tasks
    • 10.d Putting It All Into Action In Your Own Classroom
  • Post Survey
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Teaching English Language Learners: An Introduction

  • $249 through July 31, 2015
  • Use promo code July15 at checkout

Newsletter


CE Credits Online is pleased to announce it is launching the CE Credits Online Monthly Newsletter. Every month the newsletter will offer a discount on one or more CE Credits Online courses—often with savings that can amount to hundreds of dollars. The only way to receive these discounts (using a promotional code) is to receive the newsletter. The newsletter is free and will have various features we believe will be of interest to all educators.

Once you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive a confirmation email and a link to the CE Credits Online Newsletter and the discounts that are being offered for that month. Discounts change monthly.

Click Here to Sign Up.

*Does not apply to all districts

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • I found the different activity examples to be the most helpful part of this course. We all know that our students vary dramatically in their learning profiles, readiness and interests and I have been striving to address these differences since I started teaching. It is always nice to brush up on the different learning styles and how to serve them and also to think about the different memory lanes again. It is very helpful to be given additional methods and activities to reach out to these various learning styles and create lessons that will enter multiple memory lanes. I will create more anchor activities to have in my classroom so that I can spend more one-on-one time with students which will make it more possible for me to assess different student needs and to provide more successful learning experiences. I will also continue to incorporate more learning styles into my lessons; the ones I find most lacking tend to be kinesthetic/tactile activities. Furthermore, I am excited about creating multiple 'product' assessment options for students of varying abilities and interests, the idea of the learning stations has great potential in my classroom. Professional development always makes me feel refreshed and inspired to do a better job of working to reach all students and I am thankful for that.

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • This course provides educators with a foundation to impact the greatest number of students in a most effective and focused manner. Most every class is comprised of various levels of readiness, ability and achievement. All of these classes can benefit from the use of differentiation and will see real results in the form of student's increased learning. The key learnings of this course for me included, instructional strategies, differentiated assessment models, anchor activities, tiered instruction applications, use of differentiation through: content, process, and product. It also provided guidance in the use of learning modalities, in differentiation. All of these practices will be utilized in my classroom. I also found the, "Asking Powerful Questions," to be particularly informative and useful. The incorporation of strategies to increase active student participation, will also be reflected in my classroom. "Scaffolding performance tasks," was very helpful in supporting differentiation during the assessment phase, as were the many suggestion for assessing. I learned a great deal from this course and plan to incorporate as many, if not most of the practices. I plan to increase the use of these strategies, as I become more experienced in using them and as I see their effectiveness. I was particularly grateful for the overall viewpoint and approach the course had and the obvious sensitivity to the needs of all children. I believe that the course was reflective of the understanding that all children are equally valuable and have the potential to make important contribution to society, in many different ways and forms. It conveyed to educators that we are a vital and critical force in determining the path to success for our students. It also conveyed, that we must take responsibility if we prepare students in a manner that is not equitable. We can expect all students to reach their full potential if we are the vehicle which supports their individual learning needs and design our instruction around that belief. Every child has much to offer, but need us to believe in their potential and give each of them equal, individual support, for this to be realized. I appreciate the overall philosophy that every child has the right to and must have a quality education, in order to be able to become a productive member of society.

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • The lessons and course information was extremely useful and informative. I enjoyed gaining the new information and am looking forward to implement the vast majority of it in my classroom. The ideology of the coursework was also enlightening and enhanced my understanding of the course material.                                

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I found this class enlightening and encouraging. Due to working with students with severe needs I found that I already implement some of the tactics in my teaching such as scaffolding and utilizing different learning styles such as tactile and audio. I found it interesting that I tend to have the students produce the same end product when I know that the students differ in their learning styles. Reflecting on this I realized that I use what is comfortable to complete and what I feel is easiest to grade. I don't have it all figured out and there is much more that I can implement in my class. I was a little worried that differentiating instruction was going to mean that I had to individualize to each student but through working the chapters I realized that it is giving students opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge and receive knowledge through different modalities. I am aware through this class that I need to break my lesson into three pieces the content, process and product. Even though they are different I learned that all three parts blend and compliment each other.The tools I learned are the basics and foundations of good teaching. Implementing them in my classroom will not allow students to be successful but will enhance my teaching and breath new life into my lessons.

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I am surprised at the amount of material I’ve learned. Now I know the names and techniques of things I actually do within my classroom. One key component I have learned is that differentiation doesn't mean a different learning plan for each student, but using various modus operandi will address the needs of all learners in my classroom. If only just using different content, process and products doesn't reach all students then I can tier and scaffold lessons so that high, middle, and low struggling learners can reach the criteria and benchmarks that they need to meet. Students who are advanced or need extra encounters can work on anchor activities. I already have many ideas that I want to use this school year in my class, especially an "anchor wall" or an “on-going work folder” where students can come in contact with material or ideas to keep going and further their knowledge, understanding and awareness of a subject or academic focus. I do many of the things suggested in this course already, but I can do them more deliberately and with more diligence with the end in mind.

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I am so excited to put the concepts of differentiation into practice on a regular basis in my classroom in the fall. I feel a bit overwhelmed at the prospect of being able to meet all students needs, but I am so encouraged by the ideas I have gathered from the class. My biggest realization is that it is acceptable, no...NECESSARY, for different students to have different assignments and assessments depending on their readiness level. It makes so much sense. I don't know why I felt all students needed to have the same assessment when it came to assessment time. I have "dabbled" in differentiation with projects and assignments, more to try to meet interest differences that abilities. But I see that, since all students are coming to me at different starting points, it is ok to assess them in different ways. When I think about it, most higher achieving students will not complain about not having the "scaffolding" help that other students may get. They don't need it so they most likely won't want it. I think my biggest challenge will be in the process aspect of differentiation. Creating different ways for the students to learn and own the concepts will be a lot of work. I know it will be very rewarding to put it into action, but I feel this will, at first, mean a lot of work on my part. Also, since I am such a visual, tactile learner, I need to be careful to teach in ways that reach students with different learning styles than me. I want to work hard to identify what type of learner each child is so I can strive to reach them on a personal level. Wait time, groups, movement, competition, choice...I've got to keep all of these things in mind when planning my lessons to maximize my chances of reaching as many students as possible when teaching. This course has given me so many great ideas that I will refer to many times throughout my process of learning to become a differentiated teacher!

    What a participant from Colorado said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • First of all, I have completely enjoyed taking this course! I have learned a few new ideas which I definitely plan on using, and I learned that I do a fairly nice job of differentiating already. One of the things I “re-learned” is the information on learning styles/modalities. I plan on starting the school year with a learning style inventory. Kids are always interested in learning more about themselves. I will also use the results to create flexible learning groups from time to time. The “memory lanes” in the human brain will also be a factor of consideration for me as I plan my lessons. All of the ideas on how to enhance the memory lanes are great! These are all ideas that can be used right away. Other “take-aways” I plan to use include allowing kids to help write rubrics and having them create their own graphic organizers. I also plan to create more choice in process and product. One great idea I am taking away is that I need to remember to teach to the high ability kid and not the middle. All I need to do is use scaffolding to help all of my students reach that high expectation. I think sometimes and out of desperation, teachers aim for the middle because we just don’t know what to do anymore. This has definitely happened to me. I know I need to keep my eyes focused up high for my students. I’ve also learned about 30 second partner discussions, different uses for flexible groups, and questioning strategies. Finally, through taking this course, I have come across various websites which will continue to help me as I forge ahead in my classroom. Overall, it has been a worthwhile experience. Thanks.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I like the four rules that correspond with the Safety, Order, and Rights. They're easy to remember, easy to post in my classroom, and cover the bases of what I expect in my classroom. I am excited to introduce them in the fall. I think the Safety, Order, and Rights value set will be helpful. I am looking forward to explaining them to students. It is important to me that all students feel safe and included in my classroom, and I think it will help students to know that I am holding students accountable to these values. I hope my school and department will accept the value set. We have a very loose administration and discipline is left to individual teachers, so I will be on my own, but I think this set of values and rules will help me.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I have learned that differentiation means intentionally adjusting content, process, and/or product to meet the readiness levels, interests, and learning styles of all of my students. Strategically planning ahead, getting to know my students, offering them choices, and using ongoing assessments to see if each child is learning or needs more support will take a lot of effort but should make a big difference in overall student achievement. I will help students understand why what they’re learning in class is important and relevant to their own lives and give them an overview of each unit before we begin it. I will use brain-compatible strategies to help students store and retrieve information, such as using visual props and skits during direct instruction. To help students process content and skills, I will use flexible grouping based on pre-assessments, provide scaffolding and chunking to struggling students, offer compacting to high-ability students, and work individually with students who need one-on-one instruction. I will create ongoing and product performance tasks that clearly show how much each student has learned. I will differentiate these tasks by adjusting the amount of scaffolding and coaching and offering options that would appeal to students with different learning styles. Most importantly, I will strive to create a classroom environment where students feel respected, valued, and appreciated and where it is possible for each one of them to learn and experience success.

    What a participant from Georgia said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom
  • I have learned that not all students learn in the same way. It is important to vary how I instruct and evaluate them. How I differentiate instruction needs to be based on my student’s needs. I can look at their readiness, interests, and learning styles to help determine their learning needs. I knew about the auditory, visual, kinesthetic, and tactile way of learning, but had not heard of the two ways to perceive information, respond, and give feedback. Learning these will give me more tools to determine my student’s learning styles. To successfully teach a classroom of students with different needs I learned that I have to provide differentiation in how information is given, how the students process it, and how they demonstrate what they have learned. With each lesson, I have to take to take this into consideration when I am planning it out so all my students have a chance to do well. This course provided me with a variety of strategies I was not familiar with that can be used to make differentiated instruction work for all my students. For example, I started using anchor activities in order to provide my students with an ongoing activity they can work on if they have time to fill that will help reinforce concepts we are working with. Learning the different ways people remember information has helped me create lessons that my students will be more likely to remember because they are meaningful to them. I learned that it is important to plan tasks for the students that will fit their needs but also make sure they are working up to their full potential. I can use tiered instruction so students with different learning needs can come away from a lesson with the same learning goal accomplished. For example, during a lesson, some students may need extra guidance and modeling while others maximize their learning through self-guidance. Differentiating how your students show what they learned is as important as providing them with options during the learning process. This course provided me with guidelines to follow when I create a performance assessment. For example, the way I assess what my students have learned can be just as exciting and/or interesting as how they learned it.

    What a participant from Georgia said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom