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ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction

Price

ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction

Humboldt State University

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
  • Hours: 45.00
  • University Credits: 3.00
  • Promotions
What you need to know

CE Credits Online and Humboldt State University Extended Education are pleased to offer you online professional development courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.

  • Standards-based
  • Asynchronous – start at any time
  • Self-paced – work at your own convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code!
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators.

Humboldt State University (HSU): HSU offers post baccalaureate, 700 level credits based on a semester system. The credit fee due from the student is $50 per credit.  

Initiating Your University Credit Request
CE Credits Online is the course provider and Humboldt State University is the accrediting institution. The HSU Office of Extended Education issues the university credit, and there is a fee of $50 per credit.  Upon completion of your course, you have two weeks to apply and pay for university credit.   University credit fees are not included in the price listed.  Once we have verified that all your coursework is completed and approved, and we have received the credit fees, your paperwork, along with the fees, will be sent to Humboldt State University for processing at the end of each month. The processing of your credits can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of your request.

For more information regarding this process you may visit University Affiliations.

Course Description

Course Description:

This course explores the legal history and politics surrounding language assessment and the different test structures and methods used to assess English language learners. Participants will examine how standardized tests are used to measure language proficiency and academic achievement. With that framework in place, participants will explore how to specifically assess listening, speaking, reading, and writing, both individually and in an integrated fashion. Participants will also examine test taking issues and strategies and will look at how technology can be used in assessment. Special needs students will also be addressed.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • Understand technical concepts about testing: accountability and standardized achievement tests; normed and criterion-referenced tests; validity and reliability; language proficiency; and authentic/performance-based assessment evaluation.
  • Distinguish among traditional vs other test formats, and will have cognitive knowledge of the key strengths and weaknesses of traditional formats, and key test-taking strategies for ELLs.
  • Identify common characteristics of informal assessments, use a model for organizing classroom assessment, and be familiar with some common types of informal/classroom assessment.
  • Understand the process of creating and evaluating portfolios to assess English Language Learners, and apply rubrics to reading, writing, listening, and speaking tasks.
  • Understand the concept of integration of language skills, and be able to describe common methods of assessing reading, writing, listening and speaking, and a variety of ways of eliciting speech for assessment.
Syllabus
  • Course:
    ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Number of Credits:
    3 credits
  • Number of Hours:
    45 hours

Course Description:

This course explores the legal history and politics surrounding language assessment and the different test structures and methods used to assess English language learners. Participants will examine how standardized tests are used to measure language proficiency and academic achievement. With that framework in place, participants will explore how to specifically assess listening, speaking, reading, and writing, both individually and in an integrated fashion. Participants will also examine test taking issues and strategies and will look at how technology can be used in assessment. Special needs students will also be addressed.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • Understand technical concepts about testing: accountability and standardized achievement tests; normed and criterion-referenced tests; validity and reliability; language proficiency; and authentic/performance-based assessment evaluation.
  • Distinguish among traditional vs other test formats, and will have cognitive knowledge of the key strengths and weaknesses of traditional formats, and key test-taking strategies for ELLs.
  • Identify common characteristics of informal assessments, use a model for organizing classroom assessment, and be familiar with some common types of informal/classroom assessment.
  • Understand the process of creating and evaluating portfolios to assess English Language Learners, and apply rubrics to reading, writing, listening, and speaking tasks.
  • Understand the concept of integration of language skills, and be able to describe common methods of assessing reading, writing, listening and speaking, and a variety of ways of eliciting speech for assessment.

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will engage in a variety of activities to learn, practice, and apply the skills outlined in the course. This will include workbook exercises, short answers that are reviewed by a moderator, quizzes, observation and analysis of lessons, coaching interactions with a coaching partner that include feedback and analysis of both the lesson and the coaching episode. A final exam is also a part of the course. Participation in all of these areas is necessary for students to successfully complete the course with a passing grade.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see the Affiliations tab at the top of the main page, www.cecreditsonline.org, or select How to Obtain Credits under the Obtaining Credits tab within your account.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1
    • Introduction
    • 1.a An Introduction to Language Assessment
    • 1.b Immigration and the Changing School Population
    • 1.c Affecting English Language Learners U.S. Legal Mandates
    • 1.d No Child Left Behind and Adequate Yearly Progress
    • 1.e Conceptual Frameworks for Assessment
    • 1.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 2
    • 2.a Understanding Technical Concepts about Testing
    • 2.b Norm-Referenced and Criterion-Referenced Tests
    • 2.c Validity and Reliability
    • 2.d Language Proficiency
    • 2.e Lesson 2e Evaluation
    • 2.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 3
    • 3.a Constructing Standardized Language Proficiency Tests for ELL
    • 3.b Commercial tests
    • 3.c State tests
    • 3.d International tests
    • 3.e Implications for Classroom Instruction
    • 3.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 4
    • 4.a Choosing between Traditional and Performance-Based Measures
    • 4.b Multiple-Choice (MC) Tests: the Pluses and the Minuses
    • 4.c Other Common Formats for Traditional Testing
    • 4.d Cloze and Dictation
    • 4.e Test-Taking Strategies
    • 4.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 5
    • 5.a Types of Classroom and Performance-Based Assessment
    • 5.b Collecting Performance-Based and Other Classroom Assessments
    • 5.c Assessment of Process
    • 5.d Assessment of Products and Classroom Measure
    • 5.e Assessment of Decontexualized Measures
    • 5.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 6
    • 6.a Themes That Have Been Addressed in CBI Curricula
    • 6.b Criteria for Theme Selection
    • 6.c Learning Content and Language through "Multiple Exposures"
    • 6.d An Example of Exploitability in a Topic
    • 6.e Theme Selection in a Sustained Content Course in Guinea
    • 6.f Supplementary Material
  • Midterm
  • Lesson 7
    • 7.a Rubrics
    • 7.b Creating Rubrics
    • 7.c Holistic vs. Analytic and Primary Trait Rubrics
    • 7.d Generic or Task-Specific Rubrics?
    • 7.e Proficiency Rubrics
    • 7.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 8
    • 8.a Assessing Listening
    • 8.b Assessing Listening in Isolation
    • 8.c Assessing Listening in Context
    • 8.d Listening Comprehension Tasks, Part I
    • 8.e Listening Comprehension Tasks, Part 2
    • 8.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 9
    • 9.a Assessing Speaking Skills
    • 9.b Using Rubrics to Assess Speaking
    • 9.c Assessing Pronunciation and Intonation
    • 9.d Common Modes of Eliciting Speech
    • 9.e Other Sources for Assessing Speech
    • 9.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 10
    • 10.a Assessing Reading
    • 10.b Assessing Reading Comprehension, Part I
    • 10.c Assessing Reading Comprehension, Part II
    • 10.d Assessing Microskills
    • 10.e Assessing Macroskills
    • 10.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 11
    • 11.a Assessing Writing
    • 11.b What to Write about and How Long to Write (Timed Writings or Not?)
    • 11.c Holistic Scoring Rubrics
    • 11.d Analytic Scoring Rubrics
    • 11.e Assessing Grammar, Vocabulary, and Conventions of Writing
    • 11.f Supplementary Material
  • Lesson 12
    • 12a. Other Related Issues
    • 12b. Technology
    • 12c. Special Needs Students
    • 12d. Issues That Affect Assessment
    • 12e. Final Summary
    • 12f. Supplementary Material
  • Post Survey
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

CE Credits Online Anytime-Anywhere

  • Standards-based
  • University credits available*
  • Asynchronous – start at any time–24/7
  • Self-paced – work at your own pace and convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

We are affiliated with the Humboldt State University (HSU), part of the California State University System, located in Arcata, CA.

Approved for graduate level semester credits

  • 45 hours = 3 semester credits
  • 30 hours = 2 semester credits
  • 15 hours = 1 semester credit

Receiving HSU Semester Credit: On or about the 1st and the 16th of every month CECO submits completion paperwork to HSU along with the participant’s fee of $50 per credit. Processing the credits through HSU can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of the initial credit request. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Creating a Culture for Learning

  • $249 through May 31, 2015
  • Use promo code May15 at checkout

*Does not apply to all districts

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • There are four main parts to the Language Assessment Framework, the Information gathering stage, the Analyzing and Interpreting stage, the Decision and Reporting stage and the Planning stage. There are also four main sections or quadrants in the process of assessment or gathering information. They are Observation of Process, Observation of Product, Classroom Measures and Decontextualized Measures. All of this information is useful to me as I evaluate ELL students. I often use the observation of process as I first meet the students. I look at the classroom measures in their grades and quizzes and the decontextualized measures as in the CELDT scores. All of this information goes into the decision making process that is necessary to determine if a particular student should qualify for Special Education. Using all this information helps the IEP team decide if the student is learning language or if they have a true language disability and needs specialized instruction. This course helped me clearly define the areas to be looked at and assessed. Another important thing that I learned was how to use rubrics, both holistically and analytically. I know that I will use this concept in many ways to both assess the students and to help set up lesson plans.

    What a participant from California said about ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction
  •  begin with I learned the importance of incorporating all language skills into my instruction. Going forward I will be sure to include reading, listening, writing, grammar, and speaking into my instruction for each unit of study. This will hopefully increase the effectiveness of my teaching. Next, I learned that ELL's with no reading exposure in their native language struggle far more than those with reading exposure in their native tongue. This will help me in the event that i am teaching ELL's in the future I know that I need to build and expand upon what they learned in their native country, before passing judgement on their abilities. I also learned that reading strategies and reading skills are two different but related items. Strategies are taught and practiced and once they become automatic they become skills. The goal in my instruction is to help strategies become skills. Lastly, and most importantly I learned about how to evaluate a text that is used in my class. I feel that this is a great skill for me because it allows me to truly be in tune with what is being taught and how to supplement that so that I can meet my students learning needs.

    What a participant from Florida said about ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction
  • This course provided specific suggestions to use immediately in class. It also provided opportunities to delve deeper with the supplementary materials. I gained a lot from this course and would love to see a writing course for ELLs as well.  The distinction between intensive and extensive reading was a key learning for me. I am an avid reader, but it really helped to see how to tease apart 2 types of reading. I will now make sure to set my students up with the information about what kind of reading we are engaging in. Before this class, I wanted to impart a love of reading, but I wasn’t sure exactly how. I feel validated through this course that my enthusiasm for reading can be passed on to my students. I also have tools to do that now. Assigning extensive reading will help them become fluent and enjoy what they are reading! I also plan to use high frequency words with my older students. I was only using them with kindergarteners, as they are part of the curriculum. I will now incorporate those words across my classes. I will continue to do think alouds and I will not skip over them if I am short on time. I understand we must teach how to be a good reader. I am also eager to work on reading rate. My classes are ending, but I plan to test students and allow them to keep track to increase motivation. This course also inspires me to use the textbook to my students’ advantage. I will take what applies, and not stick to every part of it. Overall, this course did a wonderful job of disseminating a wealth of information. I plan to refer to the lessons and supplemental materials as I plan for next year.

    What a participant from Maryland said about ELL Language Assessment and Related Issues in the K- 12 Classroom: An Introduction
  • Wow! I really enjoyed this course. The availablity for me to work at my own pace over the summer was just what I needed. I really enjoyed the format that was used in the lessons that were presented. The refresher course on the history of education and the impact that leaders have had on our educational system was very intersting to me. There is so much that you forget after you have graduated from college and moved out into the working environment. It was a trip going down memory lane to go back and think through the theories of great minds such as those of Piaget, Maslow, Erickson, Vygotsky, Gardner and Kohlberg. I still struggle with the No Child Left Behind law. I live and teach in Alaska. Our geographics is much different from that of other states. There are many communities (villages) and teachers within these communities that struggle to meet the requirements for this law. I do appreciate this being a topic that was touched upon at the end of this course. Thank you.

    What a participant from Alaska said about Today's Classroom: Foundations of and Current Trends in Education
  • Although the one student I work one-on-one with as a teacher and counselor is in the Emotionally Handicap Program (now titled "The Comprehensive Support Program"), the setting up part of classroom rules lessons work well with my student. I know, as mentioned in the lessons, that this program was not designed for the extreme cases I work with but know that a very good portion can be applied for such special needs students. I have spoke to some colleagues about this program and will recommend it to them. I did enjoy taking this course. I felt very at ease with it. I like how I could go back and re-read certain parts of the lessons with ease. This course was very user-friendly.                                

    What a participant from Arizona said about Stopping Disruptive Behavior
  • I really enjoyed the videos. They were very well done and easy to follow and understand. I could take what I learned and apply it immediately to my own instruction.                                  

    What a participant from Arizona said about Transforming Math Instruction with Interactive Whiteboard Systems
  • This course really had me evaluate where I am currently in my teaching. I liked how I was able to consider my students in response to the course information. This course helped me make changes in how I am setting up my classroom lessons to better help my students and I am already seeing improvements in my relationships with students and their relationship with the material. The moderator's further questions helped me focus better on the material and to specify my response to the questions.                                

    What a participant from Arizona said about Maximizing Engagement of All Learners
  • I have enjoyed learning some new strategies for teaching problem solving and look forward to incorporating them into my instruction the remainder of this year, as well as with a fresh group of students from the beginning of the year next year. One element that resounded strongly with me was Polyps four steps for problem solving. I found it enlightening to learn how to improve upon an instructional strategy that I thought I was already using. The clarity and simplicity of the process helps me to help my students to dig deeper into the problems, incorporate previous learning, and have a plan for moving forward with their solution. Another learning experience I appreciated dealt with extending word problems. I never thought it could be so easy to give students multiple opportunities to solve similar problems, not to mention the opportunities to differentiate. What a great way to get the most bang for your buck when teaching kids to recognize the structure of word problems. There are many other elements of this course that I have embraced to help kids to dig deeper, and understand more.I will continue to use the four steps for problem solving and extensions daily, and I will continue to work to help them become better "math writers".

    What a participant from California said about Improving English Language Learner Instruction through the Use of Technology
  • This is my first time using CE Credits online and I was very impressed. The material was very informative and helpful and easy to navigate through. I will definitely take another course!!                                

    What a participant from California said about Conducting the Parent Conference
  • The lessons and course information was extremely useful and informative. I enjoyed gaining the new information and am looking forward to implement the vast majority of it in my classroom. The ideology of the coursework was also enlightening and enhanced my understanding of the course material.                                

    What a participant from California said about Differentiating Instruction in Your Classroom