Libraries

Reading / Language Arts

Instructional Strategies

English Language Learners

Transforming Instruction with Technology

Classroom Management / Creating Effective Learning Environments

Beginning Teachers

Special Education

School-wide Programs – Title I, Part A

Counselors

Support Staff

Customized Libraries

Highly Qualified Teacher Title II, Part A

Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed

Price

Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed

Humboldt State University

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
  • Hours: 45.00
  • University Credits: 3.00
  • Promotions
What you need to know

CE Credits Online and Humboldt State University Extended Education are pleased to offer you online professional development courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.

  • Standards-based
  • Asynchronous – start at any time
  • Self-paced – work at your own convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code!
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators.

Humboldt State University (HSU): HSU offers post baccalaureate, 700 level credits based on a semester system. The credit fee due from the student is $50 per credit.  

Initiating Your University Credit Request
CE Credits Online is the course provider and Humboldt State University is the accrediting institution. The HSU Office of Extended Education issues the university credit, and there is a fee of $50 per credit.  Upon completion of your course, you have two weeks to apply and pay for university credit.   University credit fees are not included in the price listed.  Once we have verified that all your coursework is completed and approved, and we have received the credit fees, your paperwork, along with the fees, will be sent to Humboldt State University for processing at the end of each month. The processing of your credits can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of your request.

For more information regarding this process you may visit University Affiliations.

Course Description

Course Description

This course covers the theoretical underpinnings of choice theory as well as suggested strategies for teaching choice theory to students, integrating choice theory in the learning environment, and illustrating choice theory in lesson plans across subject areas. This course focuses on conveying strategies to help teachers develop choice theory connections with and among the students in their classrooms. It is intended to present the basic concepts of choice theory and how it is applied in the classroom at any grade level. Participants will have the opportunity to learn choice theory by reflecting on its relevance in their own lives and applying it in their classrooms. This course builds a framework for understanding students’ motivations from a new perspective and an opportunity to practice choice theory by creating learning experiences for students that help them to keep school, teachers, and school work in their quality worlds for a lifetime of learning. This course will require participants to engage in self-reflection, critical thinking and personal practice of the ideas being taught. Just reading about choice theory is not enough to internalize its ideas and begin operating from them intrinsically. Personal experiences with choices theory involving critical thinking and personal practice will help participants understand the relevance and benefits of applying choice theory in their lives, in their relationships with students, and in their professional practice. Choice theory in education provides an intrinsic model of teaching and learning that is focused on increasing students’ self-understanding and their ability to evaluate their choices and schoolwork for quality and effectiveness. Austrian neurologist and renowned Holocaust survivor, Viktor Frankl affirmed, “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our responses lie our growth and our freedom.” This course will invite participants to find and explore that space of choice and freedom. As such, this course may challenge the way participants were taught to learn and teach, but all of the ideas presented in this course can be implemented in any classroom at any school if the people in those systems choose to do so.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • Learn that choice theory is an intrinsic model of psychology and learning that is based on the premise that we can make effective choices that lead to happiness
  • Understand the detriment of external control practices in relationships and schools
  • Learn the 5 basic needs of choice theory and appreciate that students’ behaviors reflect their attempts to satisfy one or more of these basic needs
  • Appreciate that everyone has a quality world that contains pictures of what is most important to them and that degrees of happiness correspond with the ability to have quality world experiences
  • Understand that all behavior is total behavior comprised of actions, thoughts, feelings, and physiology
  • Learn that all total behavior is chosen and that self-understanding increases the likelihood of making more effective choices that contribute to happiness
  • Discover that each individual has a unique creative system that is a reservoir of possibility and ingenuity
  • Understand that the threat of failure has detrimental outcomes for students and that there are considerable benefits to creating a success-based learning environment
  • Create classroom meetings plans that explore choice theory topics using the define, personalize, and challenge method of teaching
  • Understand the meaning of quality in schools and how quality is reflected by leader teachers who expect competent schoolwork and encourage quality
  • Learn how to use classroom meetings, choice theory language, connecting relationship habits, and solution-focused strategies to teach choice theory to students
  • Know the value of providing students with meaningful, relevant educational experiences and how to embed choice theory in lesson plans
Syllabus
  • Course:
    An Introduction to the Choice Theory Classroom
  • Instructor:
    William Glasser, M.D.
  • Prerequisites:
    None
  • Number of credits:
    3 Semester credits, 4 quarter credits, 45 hours

Course Description:

This course covers the theoretical underpinnings of choice theory as well as suggested strategies for teaching choice theory to students, integrating choice theory in the learning environment, and illustrating choice theory in lesson plans across subject areas. This course focuses on conveying strategies to help teachers develop choice theory connections with and among the students in their classrooms. It is intended to present the basic concepts of choice theory and how it is applied in the classroom at any grade level.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn choice theory by reflecting on its relevance in their own lives and applying it in their classrooms. This course builds a framework for understanding students’ motivations from a new perspective and an opportunity to practice choice theory by creating learning experiences for students that help them to keep school, teachers, and school work in their quality worlds for a lifetime of learning.

This course will require participants to engage in self-reflection, critical thinking and personal practice of the ideas being taught. Just reading about choice theory is not enough to internalize its ideas and begin operating from them intrinsically. Personal experiences with choices theory involving critical thinking and personal practice will help participants understand the relevance and benefits of applying choice theory in their lives, in their relationships with students, and in their professional practice.

Choice theory in education provides an intrinsic model of teaching and learning that is focused on increasing students’ self-understanding and their ability to evaluate their choices and schoolwork for quality and effectiveness. Austrian neurologist and renowned Holocaust survivor, Viktor Frankl affirmed, “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our responses lie our growth and our freedom.” This course will invite participants to find and explore that space of choice and freedom. As such, this course may challenge the way participants were taught to learn and teach, but all of the ideas presented in this course can be implemented in any classroom at any school if the people in those systems choose to do so.

Course Objectives:

  • Learn that choice theory is an intrinsic model of psychology and learning that is based on the premise that we can make effective choices that lead to happiness
  • Understand the detriment of external control practices in relationships and schools
  • Learn the 5 basic needs of choice theory and appreciate that students’ behaviors reflect their attempts to satisfy one or more of these basic needs
  • Appreciate that everyone has a quality world that contains pictures of what is most important to them and that degrees of happiness correspond with the ability to have quality world experiences
  • Understand that all behavior is total behavior comprised of actions, thoughts, feelings,and physiology
  • Learn that all total behavior is chosen and that self-understanding increases the likelihood of making more effective choices that contribute to happiness
  • Discover that each individual has a unique creative system that is a reservoir ofpossibility and ingenuity
  • Understand that the threat of failure has detrimental outcomes for students and that there are considerable benefits to creating a success-based learning environment
  • Create classroom meetings plans that explore choice theory topics using the define, personalize, and challenge method of teaching
  • Understand the meaning of quality in schools and how quality is reflected by leader teachers who expect competent schoolwork and encourage quality
  • Learn how to use classroom meetings, choice theory language, connecting relationship habits, and solution-focused strategies to teach choice theory to students
  • Know the value of providing students with meaningful, relevant educational experiences and how to embed choice theory in lesson plans

Student Expectations:

This online course is reflective and interactive. Participants will engage in a variety of critical thinking activities to learn, practice, and apply the skills outlined in the course. These will include journal exercises and forum exercises requiring short answers that are reviewed by a moderator. Each lesson is divided into multiples sections with an associated quiz. There is a midterm exam as well as a comprehensive final exam. Participants may reference course content and notes during quizzes and exams. Participation in all of these areas is necessary for students to successfully complete the course with a passing grade.

Instructor Description

Dr. Glasser is an internationally recognized psychiatrist who is best known as the author of Reality Therapy, a method of psychotherapy he created in 1965 and that is now taught all over the world.

Born in 1925 and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Glasser was initially a Chemical Engineer but went into psychiatry when it became apparent to him that this was his real interest in life. He attended medical school at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and took his psychiatric training at the Veterans Administration Hospital in West Los Angeles and UCLA (1954-57). He became Board Certified in 1961 and was in private practice from 1957 to 1986.

Glasser’s path has been one of a continuing progression from private practice to lecturing and writing and ultimately culminating in the publication of over twenty books. After writing the counseling book, Reality Therapy (1965), he published his first book on education, Schools without Failure (1969). He went on to write four additional books related to education: Choice Theory in the Classroom (1986), The Quality School (1990), The Quality School Teacher (1993), and Every Student Can Succeed (2000). In the late 70’s, Glasser was introduced to control theory systems through the writings of William T. Powers. In consultation with Powers, Dr. Glasser applied Powers’ knowledge of how systems work to the field of human behavior. That theory of why and how we behave is now called Choice Theory.

In his next key book, Choice Theory (1998), Glasser greatly expanded the understanding of motivation and behavior. He then added, Warning: Psychiatry Can Be Hazardous to Your Mental Health (2003), to help people improve their mental health and happiness. In 2005 he produced a booklet, Defining Mental Health as a Public Health Issue to provide a new resource for mental health professionals. Finally, in 2007, Eight Lessons for a Happier Marriage, which he co-authored with his wife, Carleen, became his third book to help couples learn important tools for improving their relationship.

Dr. Glasser’s approach is non-traditional. He does not believe in the concept of mental illness unless there is something organically wrong with the brain that can be confirmed by a pathologist. Very early, he came to the conclusion that genetically we are social creatures and need each other and that the cause of almost all psychological symptoms is our inability to get along with the important people in our lives. He offers choice theory to replace external control and has dedicated the remainder of his life to teaching and supporting this idea.

In 1967, he founded The Institute for Reality Therapy. Since that time, over 75,000 people worldwide have taken Intensive Training to gain knowledge on how to apply his ideas in their professional life. They have discovered that by using choice theory, their personal relationships have improved as well.

Although Dr. Glasser is retired from the speaking circuit, he remains interested in all the Institute training that is occurring worldwide. Some of Dr. Glasser’s many accomplishments are as follows:

  • Listed in Who’s Who in America since the 1970s;
  • 1990 - awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, Honoris Causa from the University of San Francisco;
  • 2003 - presented with the ACA Professional Development Award recognizing the significant contributions made to the field of counseling;
  • 2004 - presented with the "A Legend in Counseling Award" by the ACA;
  • January - 2005 presented with the prestigious Master Therapist designation by the American Psychotherapy Association; and finally,
  • 2005 - presented with the Life Achievement Award by the International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology for his enormous influence as a psychotherapist and author.

Curriculum Editors

Terri Allen, M.S., has a license in mental health counseling, a certificate in school counseling, and is Choice Theory/Reality Therapy Certified through the William Glasser Institute. Using choice theory principles, Ms. Allen counsels children with autism and other special needs and provides consultation and supportive services to parents, educators, and community members.

Carleen Glasser, M.S, is a retired school teacher and school counselor. She is a senior faculty member and instructor at the William Glasser Institute. Together with Dr. Glasser, Mrs. Glasser has written several books and educational materials about choice theory and its application in relationships and education.

Methods of Instruction

A variety of strategies are employed in this course:

  • Content presented for participants to read online—the formal instruction
  • Illustrative video vignettes of interviews with administrators, teachers, and students at a Glasser Quality School
  • Journal exercises that promote a personal understanding of the lesson topic
  • An online forum where participants to post ideas about how they would apply choice theory in their classrooms
  • Illustrative handouts are provided to serve as guides for teachers as they create their own curriculum supplements; they can also be used “as is” for instruction and exploration

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see University Affiliations under the Information Center for the cost per credit.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1
    • 1 - Introduction
    • 1.a Course Structure & Outline of the Online Course
    • 1.b An Introduction to Choice Theory
  • Lesson 2
    • 2 - Choice Theory & Internal Motivation
    • 2.a Choice is an Internal Motivation Psychologyn
    • 2.b We Choose Everything We Do
    • 2.c Choice Theory is a Psychology of Hope
    • 2.d Choice Theory is a Psychology of Self-Discovery
  • Lesson 3
    • 3 - External Control Psychology
    • 3.a Introduction
    • 3.b Internal Motivation vs. External Control
    • 3.c The Four Variations of External Control Psychology
    • 3.d The Three False Beliefs of External Control Psychology
    • 3.e The 7 Deadly and 7 Caring Relationship Habits
  • Lesson 4
    • 4 - Our Basic Needs
    • 4.a The Needs That Drive Our Behavior
    • 4.b The Basic Needs: SURVIVAL
    • 4.c The Basic Needs: LOVE & BELONGING
    • 4.d The Basic Needs: POWER
    • 4.e The Basic Needs: FREEDOM
    • 4.f The Basic Needs: FUN
  • Lesson 5
    • 5 - The Quality Word
    • 5.a From the Real World to the Perceived World
    • 5.b The Quality World
    • 5.c The Basic Needs and The Quality World
    • 5.d Discrepancies Between Reality and The Quality World
    • 5.e Dynamic Interactions When Quality Worlds Encounter One Another
    • 5.f Harmful Quality World Images
  • Lesson 6
    • 6 - Total Behavior
    • 6.a The Four Components of Total Behavior: Actions, Thoughts, Feelings, Physiology
    • 6.b All Total Behavior is Chosen
  • Lesson 7
    • 7 - Creativity
    • 7.a Creativity and Learning
    • 7.b Two Part Behavioral System – Organized and Reorganizing Behaviors
    • 7.c Frustrated Creativity
    • 7.d Making Choices and Knowing When to Ask for Help
    • 7.f Supplementary Materials
  • Lesson 8
    • 8 - No Failure in a Choice Theory Classroom
    • 8.a The Harm of Threatening Failure
    • 8.b The Benefit of Removing the Threat of Failure
    • 8.c The Value of Caring Relationships in Promoting Success
    • 8.d The Value of Student-Lead Homework
  • Lesson 9
    • 9 - Quality in the Choice Theory Classroom
    • 9.a Expecting Competent Work from Students
    • 9.b Quality in a Choice Theory Learning Environment
    • 9.c Quality Schoolwork
    • 9.d Teachers as Lead Managers
  • Lesson 10
    • 10 - Creating a Choice Theory Classroom
    • 10.a Using Class Meetings to Teach Choice Theory
    • 10.b Connecting Replaces Discipline
    • 10.c Problem Solving and Conflict Resolution with Choice Theory
    • 10.d The Language of Choice Theory
  • Lesson 11
    • 11 - Integrating Choice Theory in Learning and Lesson Plans
    • 11 - Overview – Creating Lesson Plans
    • 11.a Lesson Plans that Increase Student Motivation to Learn
    • 11.c Lessons Plans that are Embedded with Choice Theory Principles
    • 11.d Lesson Plans that Use Choice Theory as a Tool for Investigation and Understanding
  • Lesson 12
    • 12 - A Brief Introduction to Glasser Quality Schools
    • 12.a An Introduction to Glasser Quality Schools
    • 12.b Excerpt from the Ireland Convention Lecture (edited), 2005
    • Resource Page
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

CE Credits Online Anytime-Anywhere

  • Standards-based
  • University credits available*
  • Asynchronous – start at any time–24/7
  • Self-paced – work at your own pace and convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

We are affiliated with the Humboldt State University (HSU), part of the California State University System, located in Arcata, CA.

Approved for graduate level semester credits

  • 45 hours = 3 semester credits
  • 30 hours = 2 semester credits
  • 15 hours = 1 semester credit

Receiving HSU Semester Credit: On or about the 1st and the 16th of every month CECO submits completion paperwork to HSU along with the participant’s fee of $50 per credit. Processing the credits through HSU can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of the initial credit request. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Creating a Culture for Learning

  • $249 through May 31, 2015
  • Use promo code May15 at checkout

*Does not apply to all districts

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • In this class I learned how to the Smart board technology in greater detail. Taking Notebook pages and combining them into a single screen will be useful in my future lessons. I also will be using the shade screen to hide unwanted information, like advertisements, from the view of my students. The screen shade will also be useful when creating tables and T-charts in order to show students information slowly, rather than all at one time. I found the magic pen, capture tool bar, and magnify options to be very useful, especially for students with disabilities that need help to focus on certain information. The idea of the screen zooming in or highlighting a certain area while dark in other areas is very appealing to the students and stands out when they think back at the lesson. I also learned how to use the more graphic options, saving pictures that student created, grouping images, and cloning images to create copies with ease. I will use these skills to help when I return to coaching basketball. This course has been very information I will be using all the math and language arts skills that I learned in my future practices.

    What a participant from Arizona said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • This course has been very useful in finding information that is meaningful for me and for my students. I think it is easy to get tied up in the power struggle and to fight students to get them to behave in a way that is acceptable, but I have learned that is not the best way, students have to make the choice for their own actions. I can be a facilitator in their learning process and I can help them to see what motivates their behavior and what they can expect to see as a result of the choices they make. They are in control of their own learning and they have to understand that their own quality world will make the difference in how their behaviors and actions play out today. I can get to know more of my difficult students and help them to understand that failing is not an option, that they can choose success, hard work and the benefits gained from those great choices.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • When I started this course, some of the concepts seemed very strange to me. For example, it seemed counter-intuitive to say we are always in control of our own behavior. I came up with a hundred different rebuttals in my head regarding ways in which I felt we are not in control: If I don't administer the TCAP exam in my class, I will be fired, etc. I now understand that at the heart of it, I can choose to administer that test or not. I may not be in control of the consequences, but I am certainly in control of what I personally do, think and feel. I think it's easy for kids (and adults) to see themselves as victims when things happen to them. When they are failing at school, they can be quick to say "It's not my fault...we're poor and nobody cares about me." It is then easy for the parent to say "It's the teacher's fault for not teaching my child." It is easy for the teacher to say "It's the child's fault for not doing his homework, not paying attention in school, not caring, etc. And it's the parent's fault for not backing me up and making the child do his homework." The bottom line is that when the system is set up from a standpoint of external control, then we aren't teaching our children to take personal responsibility for themselves to begin with. So my views on personal choice have definitely changed due to this class. I have always been one to allow choices in my classroom to a certain extent, but I will make that a bigger focus in the future. The concept of the Quality World also resonates with me. I think the more I can get to know my students personally and find out what is important to them, the more buy-in they will have in their own educational process as well as in the functioning of our classroom. From now on my focus will be more on "What can I do to help you?" than on nagging students to get work done. As a former gifted and talented teacher, I appreciate Glassers thoughts on creativity. The growing lack of creativity in schools has been a huge concern of mine, and I think Choice Theory nails that situation on the head. Without freedom and fun, creativity becomes stifled. Once students feel free to be themselves and to explore and have fun with their learning, creativity blossoms. We take off the walls and ceilings of the boxes we have put students in, and without those walls, they can grow in all directions. To foster this freedom, again, I think choice is the answer. There is absolutely no reason why I can't offer students choices when it comes to products that demonstrate their learning. I learned many things in this course that I can implement in my classroom, but fostering internal control, choice, creativity and freedom, and tapping into students' quality worlds are the things on which I plan to focus first.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • I received my bachelor's degree in psychology, so as someone steeped in the learning of Skinner, this course has been very interesting. Despite my educational background, I find choice theory to be highly intuitive. Personally, I can frame my life in terms of basic needs, my quality world and by total behavior. And, I can see how my quality world differs from those of important people in my life and how this discrepancy can create some conflict. However, considering people's behavior given a choice theory framework, I believe, allows for greater understanding. In terms of my students, I will use choice theory to better understand my students' basic needs, quality worlds, and total behaviors. I will incorporate activities with the purpose of learning about my students' quality worlds so that I can make their work in speech therapy more meaningful. I would also like to support my students' exploration of control in their lives as we learn about total behavior and how they have control over their thoughts and actions. Many of my students express that they feel very little control in their lives, so I think that an exploration of this concept within the framework of choice theory will be highly empowering for them.

    What a participant from Colorado said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • I feel that his class has helped me to see discipline in my classroom in a new way. I know that going into next year I will make it a point to ask students questions that allow me to see what need they are trying to fulfill. I will use the puzzles and worksheets that are included in this class to help students to understand why they acted the way they did. I will incorporate classroom meetings into our week. I will also inform my students and their parents that failure isn't an option in our classroom. The course showed me that the threat of failure doesn't help anyone. I will try not to use the deadly habits in converts siting with others.

    What a participant from Illinois said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • This course was easy to keep working at. It maintained my interest whereas other courses I have taken were a struggle to force myself to continue with. It may have been the quizzes at the end of each lesson that kept me going. One of the topics that I liked was the three questions at every learner's heart: 1) Can I learn? 2) Can I learn here? 3) Can I learn here with you? In the back of my mind, I realize that I have always looked at these questions with my students, but never wrote them out. My philosophy is that EVERY student can learn in my classroom under my guidance. This is due to the mutual respect that I develop with my students. Also every student is different so no one approach will work with all students. In the future I plan to make sure all of my students can answer yes to the three questions. I also plan to better prove that "Empathy sees but compassion shows." I believe that I have done adequately in this area, but there is always room for improvement. I had never heard of ACE's before. When working with my students, I will better understand their needs by understanding ACE's. While working towards a compassionate school (or in my case, a compassionate classroom) I will reflect on my work with ICARE.

    What a participant from Iowa said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • The course made me reevaluate my interaction with kids. My interaction with kids has waned some as my family has gotten older. We have to have a relationship with kids to help their learning. There are several things that pop into my mind about this course. I do not agree with all of them but many ideas expressed in this course will be implemented into my teaching practices. I was intrigued by the view on homework I totally agree that we can only control the time we have the students with us. We have to peek the interest of the students so that they want to research and explore more on the topics we cover in class outside the classroom. We have to have the students be intrinsically motivated to want to do homework assignments after the class time has ended. This philosophy also levels the playing field between the high flyers and the average and lower students. There are students that do not have time to do homework because of work and family obligations. There are also kids that do not see the point of homework and refuse to do it. The achievement gap between these groups continues to widen with the assignment of more pointless, busy work we give students outside of our class. Homework must be reevaluated for content and purpose. The concept of all students getting an A seems like a intriguing idea. This is a concept that is being thrown around in our school where students meet standards vs getting grades. When students get onto the real world they find careers that interest them and in an environment where they are not controlled much or at all. That is where are quality world comes in. We do what makes us happy where our expectation align with our reality. We choose careers we enjoy. We are motivated from within and want to succeed in careers we like. As a teacher it is important to give students options and choices in classroom academics and where conflict may arise. Thank You!!

    What a participant from Iowa said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • This course has opened my eyes to several things. First, I became more acutely aware of how much external control is used in education and in society in general. I regret to say, that as a mother I have used it far too much with my boys. As a teacher, I have resorted to it as well. This course has heightened my awareness of the negative consequences of external control. I will be even more conscientious in limiting my use of the 7 deadly habits and try to replace them with the 7 caring relationship habits. In so doing, I hope to limit my classroom of external control. A second take-away was just a reinforcement of what I have always practiced and that is the importance of quality world as student motivation for behavior. Understanding my students' quality worlds is essential for their success in my classroom. Always has been, and now I know better why! Lastly, I found concept of competence the total behavior model very informative. I will try to use this in my educational practice as a way to understand my behavior and my students. It made a lot of sense to me. I think one way I will use this in my classroom by applying it to behavior of characters in readings in English to begin with. Lastly, I found the concept of competency based work to be worthy of more thought. As a math teacher, work is often right or wrong, although I have always been a firm believer in giving students more credit for the process than for simply the correct answer. The idea of open-testing, using peers for help, etc is something I will need to put more thought into. I have used some of these ideas in the past in my classes, but I think I would like to investigate further how these concepts of competency, schooling, using knowledge to problem solve and open testing can be applied (and endorsed by my school) in my classroom. So, in summary this course has challenged me to rethink about some of what I do as a classroom teacher for over 30 years. I know I will implement much of what I have learned, and hope to pass on these concepts to my colleagues in the school I teach at in Spain.

    What a participant from Minnesota said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • Overall, I thought the course was worthwhile. I have been applying many of the concepts taught in the course without realizing it was called Choice Theory. I especially enjoyed the forum posts and reading what others have done in their classes. I was challenged to think more about external control and how much I resort to that without even realizing it; even in my own home as a mother. I think the biggest challenge will be trying to incorporate the aspects of competency based learning within a system that may not completely endorse that approach to learning.                                

    What a participant from Minnesota said about Choice Theory in the Classroom: Where Every Student Can Succeed
  • Wow! I really enjoyed this course. The availablity for me to work at my own pace over the summer was just what I needed. I really enjoyed the format that was used in the lessons that were presented. The refresher course on the history of education and the impact that leaders have had on our educational system was very intersting to me. There is so much that you forget after you have graduated from college and moved out into the working environment. It was a trip going down memory lane to go back and think through the theories of great minds such as those of Piaget, Maslow, Erickson, Vygotsky, Gardner and Kohlberg. I still struggle with the No Child Left Behind law. I live and teach in Alaska. Our geographics is much different from that of other states. There are many communities (villages) and teachers within these communities that struggle to meet the requirements for this law. I do appreciate this being a topic that was touched upon at the end of this course. Thank you.

    What a participant from Alaska said about Today's Classroom: Foundations of and Current Trends in Education