Libraries

Reading / Language Arts

Instructional Strategies

English Language Learners

Transforming Instruction with Technology

Classroom Management / Creating Effective Learning Environments

Beginning Teachers

Special Education

School-wide Programs – Title I, Part A

Counselors

Support Staff

Customized Libraries

Highly Qualified Teacher Title II, Part A

How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics

Price

How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics

Humboldt State University

  • Tuition: $375.00
  • Tuition: $345.00
  • (You Save: $30.00)
  • Hours: 45.00
  • University Credits: 3.00
  • Promotions
What you need to know

CE Credits Online and Humboldt State University Extended Education are pleased to offer you online professional development courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.

  • Standards-based
  • Asynchronous – start at any time
  • Self-paced – work at your own convenience
  • Completely online – no commuting, parking, missed classes and no dress code!
  • User friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies and skills
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators.

Humboldt State University (HSU): HSU offers post baccalaureate, 700 level credits based on a semester system. The credit fee due from the student is $50 per credit.  

Initiating Your University Credit Request
CE Credits Online is the course provider and Humboldt State University is the accrediting institution. The HSU Office of Extended Education issues the university credit, and there is a fee of $50 per credit.  Upon completion of your course, you have two weeks to apply and pay for university credit.   University credit fees are not included in the price listed.  Once we have verified that all your coursework is completed and approved, and we have received the credit fees, your paperwork, along with the fees, will be sent to Humboldt State University for processing at the end of each month. The processing of your credits can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of your request.

For more information regarding this process you may visit University Affiliations.

Course Description

Course Objectives:

  • explore a wide range of instructional strategies for math problem solving and math communication
  • learn to create exciting math lessons that are challenging and achievable for all your students
  • find a focus on strategies that can be applied across all grade levels in mathematics
  • learn practical ideas and instructional strategies that they can immediately use with their students
  • look at teaching strategies that can help students accomplish the four main tasks of problem solving:
    • understanding the problem and what it is asking
    • analyzing the problem to determine its structure
    • choosing a solution process and carrying it out correctly
    • explaining that process, both orally and in writing

Course Description:

An in-depth exploration of teaching systematic approaches for solving math word problems and developing written communication skills to describe solution processes. Teachers will learn a wide range of strategies to develop students’ skills in the math problem-solving tasks of:
  • comprehending the problem and identifying relevant data
  • analyzing the problem’s internal structure to determine what type of problem it is
  • selecting a viable solution process and carrying it out
  • explaining the solution process both orally and in writing
Syllabus
  • Course:
    How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • Prerequisites:
    None

Course Description:

An in-depth exploration of teaching systematic approaches for solving math word problems and developing written communication skills to describe solution processes. Teachers will learn a wide range of strategies to develop students’ skills in the math problem-solving tasks of:
  • comprehending the problem and identifying relevant data
  • analyzing the problem’s internal structure to determine what type of problem it is
  • selecting a viable solution process and carrying it out
  • explaining the solution process both orally and in writing.

Course Objectives: Participants will

  • explore a wide range of instructional strategies for math problem solving and math communication
  • learn to create exciting math lessons that are challenging and achievable for all your students
  • find a focus on strategies that can be applied across all grade levels in mathematics
  • learn practical ideas and instructional strategies that they can immediately use with their students
  • look at teaching strategies that can help students accomplish the four main tasks of problem solving:
    • understanding the problem and what it is asking
    • analyzing the problem to determine its structure
    • choosing a solution process and carrying it out correctly
    • explaining that process, both orally and in writing

Student Expectations:

This online course is experiential and interactive. Participants will engage in a variety of activities to learn, practice, and apply the skills outlined in the course. This will include workbook exercises, short answers that are reviewed by a moderator, quizzes, observation and analysis of lessons, coaching interactions with a coaching partner that include feedback and analysis of both the lesson and the coaching episode. A final exam is also a part of the course. Participation in all of these areas is necessary for students to successfully complete the course with a passing grade.

Credit:

Upon completion of the course, students can decide if they would like to receive credit and from which university they would like to receive credit. Please see University Affiliations under the Information Center for the cost per credit.

Class Outline:

  • Lesson 1
    • 1.a Introduction
    • 1.b What Do Emotions Have to Do With It?
    • 1.c What Can Go Wrong in Problem Solving?
  • Lesson 2
    • 2.a Now a Word From the Experts
    • 2.b Classroom Strategies For Improving Math Problem Solving
  • Lesson 3
    • 3.a How to Read a Math Word Problem – And Understand It
    • 3.b Looking for Deep Structures
  • Lesson 4
    • 4.a What Do Successful Problem Solvers Do?
    • 4.b Using Polya’s Steps in Your Own Teaching
    • 4.c A Menu of Problem Solving Strategies
  • Midterm
  • Lesson 5
    • 5.a Teaching Specific Strategies
    • 5.b Using Multiple Strategies
    • 5.c How Did Middle School Students Solve It?
  • Lesson 6
    • 6.a Questions That Make Students Think
    • 6.b Have I Ever Seen This Problem Before?
  • Lesson 7
    • 7.a Communication in Mathematics
    • 7.b Math Journals
    • 7.c But I’m Not An English Teacher
  • Lesson 8
    • 8.a Implementing Student Self Assessment
    • 8.b How to Know When Students Are Improving Conclusion
  • Post Survey
  • Evaluation
  • Final Exam

Contact Information:

info@cecreditsonline.org

425.788.7275

Your State Information

*University Credits: All CE Credits Online courses are eligible for University Credit. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

We are affiliated with the Humboldt State University (HSU), part of the California State University System, located in Arcata, CA.

Approved for graduate level semester credits

  • 45 hours = 3 semester credits
  • 30 hours = 2 semester credits
  • 15 hours = 1 semester credit

Receiving HSU Semester Credit: On or about the 1st and the 16th of every month CECO submits completion paperwork to HSU along with the participant’s fee of $50 per credit. Processing the credits through HSU can take up to 6-8 weeks from the time of the initial credit request. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information. (University credit fees are additional)

Promotions

Teaching English Language Learners: An Introduction

  • $249 through July 31, 2015
  • Use promo code July15 at checkout

Newsletter


CE Credits Online is pleased to announce it is launching the CE Credits Online Monthly Newsletter. Every month the newsletter will offer a discount on one or more CE Credits Online courses—often with savings that can amount to hundreds of dollars. The only way to receive these discounts (using a promotional code) is to receive the newsletter. The newsletter is free and will have various features we believe will be of interest to all educators.

Once you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive a confirmation email and a link to the CE Credits Online Newsletter and the discounts that are being offered for that month. Discounts change monthly.

Click Here to Sign Up.

*Does not apply to all districts

Why Choose CE Credits Online

CE Credits Online has been providing continuing education credits to K-12 educators since 2002. Our courses are offered nationwide, serving the professional learning needs of thousands of K-12 educators. Our courses are:

  • Standards-based
  • High-quality online professional learning courses designed to improve teaching and student achievement.
  • 100% online - no commuting, no missed classes, and no dress code.
  • Self-paced courses, offering participants the flexibility to work anytime, anywhere, 24/7.
  • Facilitated by highly trained moderators, experienced in education 
  • User-friendly and engaging with numerous videos that model new strategies & skills 
  • All CE Credit Online courses are eligible for University Credits (for an additional fee) through our university affiliates. Please visit our University Affiliation page for more information.

Our courses cover a variety of instructional areas and meet the needs of many educator groups, including;

  • Reading / Language Arts
  • Instructional Strategies
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Transforming Instruction with Technology
  • Classroom and Behavior Management
  • Creating Effective Learning Environments
  • Beginning Teachers
  • Special Education
  • Counseling
  • Support Staff
Reviews
  • With this class and my own experiences of seeing how emotions sometimes prevented me from viewing a word problem correctly, I see the importance of creating that effective classroom learning experience that will help my students solve word problems successfully and for them to describe their solution processes clearly. I see the importance of and will implement the four main tasks of problem solving in my class (1. understanding the problem and what it is asking; 2. analyzing the problem to determine its structure; 3. choosing a solution process and carrying it out correctly; 4. explaining that process, both orally an in writing). After taking this course, I plan to have my students see the deeper structure of math word problems. I have seen first hand how language arts journal writing has empowered my students, so I can't wait to implement math journals as well. The same applies as I plan to expand using math rubrics. Again, I have enjoyed learning from this class and can't wait to incorporate them in my own class and share them with my peers.

    What a participant from California said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • The key things I learned from this course is the following: It is important to help students be aware that confusion or not knowing how to solve a math problem is normal and to be comfortable with this. That there are deep structures within problems. I need to teach students a step-by-step problem solving approaching, such as Polya's Four Steps which includes understand the problem, devise a plan, carry out the plan and look back. Included with this a list of possible strategies that can be implemented to solve particular problems. I need to model for my students how to read, comprehend, and think about problems. I also need to ask my students probing, coaching, and intermediate questions. Talking and writing need to be a regular part of my math lessons, and students need to be taught to self-assess their skills in writing explanations to their solutions.

    What a participant from California said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • I feel that I did get a lot out of this class. I have been making a conscious effort over the last couple of years to get students doing more writing and reflection, and I have been using rubrics, but not as much focus on problem-solving and word problems as I will be as we move further into the Common Core Standards. I was not able to put everything into practice throughout this course just yet, but I applied what I learned here (like the questioning strategies) to prior classroom instruction and improved it using what I was learning, including past responses of students and anticipated responses. One of the most important things I am taking away from this course understanding the importance of getting students to slow down and not dive into the problem trying to solve it. It is vital for me to directly teach student HOW to use strategies and problem-solve. With the various questioning strategies and the first two steps in Polya’s problem-solving steps, students learn to ask questions, define and consider vocabulary, and consider the problem’s structure in effort to understand it, and devise an appropriate and thoughtful plan to solve it. This will be different for them because they are used to focusing on getting an answer, and now it is more about the process. In doing so, I also have realized the effectiveness of reflecting on the process. I have tried to get students to do this before, but I feel with using Polya’s “Look Back” step, evaluating the process, considering extensions, and using self-assessment rubrics and writing responses, more connections are made and they better understand the concepts, and more importantly, how and when to apply them. This is how they will become better problem-solvers. Therefore, this culture in the classroom to try new things, work together, communicate about their learning leads to more confidence and comfort at tackling difficult problems. I am excited to apply what I have I have learned as part of my regular instruction and witness students be more successful with problem-solving and communicating their thought processes.

    What a participant from California said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • The Four Steps of Problem Solving from lesson 4 is the one critical math process I keep referring to over and over again. Through numerous practices those four steps are embedded in my brain and I feel very comfortable modeling that right off the bat. The students will keep a copy of Polya’s Four Steps of Problem Solving inside their math notebooks. By demonstrating I will familiarize them with the coaching, probing, and intermediate questioning strategy that compliments the Four Problem Solving Steps. It gives the students another tool to be able to check their own reasoning, as well as, allow them to probe and prompt their peers when working with a partner, small group, or class discussions. These instructional approaches and strategies- promote thinking, questioning strategy, and modeling will improve their math problem solving. Therefore, I can facilitate an effective classroom learning experiences to create a supportive and positive problem solving atmosphere.

    What a participant from California said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • As a veteran teacher of 33 years, I learned a lot throughout this course. I learned that the problem-solving strategies that I use are very similar to the problem-solving strategies presented in this course. Engagement is the key to success and helping students pick out the main ideas from problems and modeling this behavior with the students will then help the students solve problems on their own. Cooperative learning is a vital tool to help students be able to understand and explain their strategies. I also find that using journals aid students in being able to express themselves. In my practice, I hope to have students do more self-assessment through the use of rubrics. I have enjoyed this course tremendously, and I take away from it a few new ideas that can make my practice even better.

    What a participant from Georgia said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • This course was great and so convenient for me to use. I have recommended this course and other courses from you to my colleagues. I didn't think I would like something like this but this course has changed my mind. I am thinking about taking another course from you in the near future.  What I have learned from this course is that problem solving can be fun! I now know that I don't have to be afraid of solving word problems and either do my students. I have also learned that talking and writing should be apart of my daily math lessons. I have been doing this and my students are loving it. My class also likes the steps I have listed to solving problems hanging in my classroom. It is so nice to refer to the steps when solving problems. They also like that they may not get the answer the 1st time but trying again seems to help and not giving up. I will be practicing my students evaluating their own work with rubrics. I see that this tool will be essential in evaluating my students understanding of problem solving. This course has been very helpful and useful to me. Thanks for making this fun and useful to me and my class.

    What a participant from Illinois said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • I liked the strategies I learned for approaching and breaking down word problems so that students can understand and solve them with more success. I liked the ideas I received for implementing more writing into my math classes. I will use all of these skills next school year.                                  

    What a participant from Illinois said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • Through this course, I have learned a more organized manner of teaching students how to approach, work through, and successfully solve math word problems. Using Polya’s Four Steps gives students an overall approach to understanding, planning, working through, and checking their work when solving a word problem. Plus, other strategies presented in this course can be woven into Polya’s Four Steps to deepen students’ abilities, as well as my approaches to teaching word problems. For instance, the “talking out loud strategy” can be used in the “understanding” step to ensure that students can identify their known and unknown variables. (Of course, it could also be used model Polya’s whole approach to a problem, as well.) The ABC List also coordinates well with Polya’s second “planning” step, and can be especially useful for students who like “structure” when they solve problems, or who feel “lost” and need a reference when working through word problems. While I do “model” my problem solving strategies in front of my students, I feel that this course has given me tools to be able to elaborate upon those strategies and expand them even more. I also enjoyed learning about the ideas for having students take pictures of themselves acting out word problems. I think this idea could be developed into a great in-class activity using an online Web 2.0 tool for creating picture slideshows and setting them to music or student voice-overs. Furthermore, I’m excited to try some writing activities with my students next year. While I have done journal entries in the past, I have gotten away from them in recent years. But, reading about having students re-write word problems “with new clothes” and grade each other’s writings really inspired me to plan/build these activities into my curriculum. Again, I think these writing ideas could be developed further through the use of technology. I think students would be highly engaged in writing about how a lesson went (good or bad) or what they still need clarification on if they could Tweet about it. And, I would really like to try multiple approaches to writing in math, as a daily/weekly exit slip, for example, instead of having students write one, multi-paragraph journal entry every chapter. Thus, I feel that I have a better understanding of how to break word problems down into manageable pieces for my students, as well as creative ways to incorporate more writing about math into my classroom this next school year.       

    What a participant from Illinois said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • I liked taking the online course. It helped that I could do it when I wanted. There were some helpful tools that I plan to use during the next school year.  This course were two different ideas: 1) learning different problem solving strategies and 2) communicating how you about solving the problem. Emotions have a lot to do with a students learning. If they do not feel secure, safe, and confident, their problem solving will suffer. To help overcome the negative emotion, you have given us strategies to help students work through and solve a problem. Reading carefully and often, analyzing what you know and what you need to find out, using straetigies that are comfortabel to each individual to help carry out the process, and then communicating the result are vital to problem solving. It is important for the teacher to model these steps for students so students have a good understanding on how to proceed. Marilyn Burns math class is a time to talk, and I agree with that statement. In taking that a step further, I believe communication amoungst the students is even more important. Recently I finish a 2-year action research project that focused on my classroom discourse. I was videotaped multiple times and analyzed those tapes and I was able to see the importance of the teacher stepping aside and allowing the discussion to happen between the students. During one of my videotaped sessions, there was approximately 9 minutes of discussion regarding a problem between the students in which I was not asked for help. All communication happened between them. This course focused more on communication after the problem has been solved.

    What a participant from Michigan said about How to “Read and Write” in Math: Improving Problem Solving and Communication in Mathematics
  • Wow! I really enjoyed this course. The availablity for me to work at my own pace over the summer was just what I needed. I really enjoyed the format that was used in the lessons that were presented. The refresher course on the history of education and the impact that leaders have had on our educational system was very intersting to me. There is so much that you forget after you have graduated from college and moved out into the working environment. It was a trip going down memory lane to go back and think through the theories of great minds such as those of Piaget, Maslow, Erickson, Vygotsky, Gardner and Kohlberg. I still struggle with the No Child Left Behind law. I live and teach in Alaska. Our geographics is much different from that of other states. There are many communities (villages) and teachers within these communities that struggle to meet the requirements for this law. I do appreciate this being a topic that was touched upon at the end of this course. Thank you.

    What a participant from Alaska said about Today's Classroom: Foundations of and Current Trends in Education